socket

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socket

1. a device into which an electric plug can be inserted in order to make a connection in a circuit
2. Chiefly Brit such a device mounted on a wall and connected to the electricity supply
3. a part with an opening or hollow into which some other part, such as a pipe, probe, etc., can be fitted
4. a spanner head having a recess suitable to be fitted over the head of a bolt and a keyway into which a wrench can be fitted
5. Anatomy
a. a bony hollow into which a part or structure fits
b. the receptacle of a ball-and-socket joint

socket

[′säk·ət]
(electricity)
A device designed to provide electric connections and mechanical support for an electronic or electric component requiring convenient replacement.
(engineering)
A device designed to receive and grip the end of a tubular object, such as a tool or pipe.

socket

1. Same as coupling.
2. British term for bell, 2.

socket

(networking)
The Berkeley Unix mechansim for creating a virtual connection between processes. Sockets interface Unix's standard I/O with its network communication facilities. They can be of two types, stream (bi-directional) or datagram (fixed length destination-addressed messages). The socket library function socket() creates a communications end-point or socket and returns a file descriptor with which to access that socket. The socket has associated with it a socket address, consisting of a port number and the local host's network address.

Unix manual page: socket(2).

socket

(1) A receptacle that receives a plug. See plugs and sockets.

(2) See Unix socket.
References in periodicals archive ?
Then, using a chisel and a sledgehammer, they pounded between the tusk and its tooth socket.
Their work shows that a tooth can be grown "orthotopically," or in the tooth socket.
The clearance also covers soft tissue curettage for post extraction tooth socket.
This new clearance also covers soft tissue curettage for post extraction tooth socket, which represents more than 30 million potential treatments per year, further entrenching BIOLASE's position as the world leader in the dental laser market.
One method of controlling bleeding without suspending the anticoagulant is the use of platelet-rich plasma gel placed in post-extraction tooth sockets.