top-heavy


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top-heavy

(of a business enterprise) having too many executives
References in periodicals archive ?
Surprisingly, their results showed that the top-heavy bugs hovered stably while those with a lower center of mass could not maintain their balance.
She introduced a private bill, backed by the transport select committee, to outlaw top-heavy loads.
To make it less likely that a plan would be deemed top-heavy, the EGTRRA narrowed the definition of key employees by nearly doubling the compensation limit from $67,500 in 2000 to $130,000 in 2001.
Generally, the claims are brought after the company has learned it has incurred a large top-heavy obligation.
Section 613 of EGTRRA (a pension bill that took effect in 2002) amended several provisions of section 416 of the internal Revenue Code, including provisions related to the requirements for determining whether a plan is a top-heavy plan for a plan year.
The April 15th Israel Solidarity Rally was top-heavy with liberal-left CFR members, such as Representatives Richard Gephardt and Jane Harman, Senator Charles Schumer, AFL-CIO President John J.
The Church is very top-heavy in European-born saints who also happened to be either bishops, priests, or religious.
Her writing style was not overblown or top-heavy with metaphors and symbolism, but rather almost anti-New Yorker in approach, with a leanness and frankness rarely seen in the pages of a publication reserved for the stiff trend interpreters of the city's tony elite.
It's a perfectly legitimate argument: The book, after all, has the top-heavy issues of race and class already on its wide and elliptical mind.
The more top-heavy the vehicle is, the more likely it is to roll over, it added.
And given the top-heavy status of today's market, Pattison's view is remarkably tonic.
Conservative top-heavy companies and government red tape have hindered the Internet revolution here.