totalitarian

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totalitarian

of, denoting, relating to, or characteristic of a dictatorial one-party state that regulates every realm of life
References in periodicals archive ?
Such a broadly totalistic understanding of CT can be so unwieldy and broad as to be unhelpful.
Insofar as means and ends become consonant within post-leftist practice, the goal then becomes not a single, totalistic utopia, but 'a world in which many worlds fit' (Marcos 2001 [1996], p.
For one thing, it is also true, as recent research has shown, that Marx himself was by no means above invoking rights as a basis of progressive reform, in spite of his apparently totalistic rejection of them before.
Islamists imagine Islam as a totalistic and divine system for organizing politics, culture, law and economic life.
My first point is that if we think about environment this way, we are going to make ourselves and everyone else crazy, and we are going to have a very difficult time recognizing the rights of individuals to do things differently because our regulatory outlook will be totalistic.
Boris Groys (28) has argued that the avant-garde and socialist realism shared several traits: the desire to transform rather than merely represent life, the belief in a totalistic, all-encompassing artistic vision and contempt for commercialized culture as part of an overall aesthetic-political project--an attempt to organize society and everyday life according to aesthetic sensibilities and political principles.
Indeed, it was the Multitudes totalistic, fanatical commitment to the group mission that culminated in the type of immature love that Erich Fromm referred to as "symbiotic union" (Fromm, 1956, p.
The history of theology--indeed much of the history of philosophy--is a search for all-embracing systems that reflect the allegedly totalistic nature of the Absolute whether theistic, deist or pantheistic.
In summary, what we are witnessing is not really a clash of civilizations but rather liberal humanitarian and authoritarian totalistic values clashing within each and every society that has failed to develop the first set of values.
In the 1970's, the media regularly denounced authoritarian and totalistic religious groups as exploitative "cults," which scorned the privacy and individuality of their members.
As the nature of war itself became increasingly totalistic and more destructive, the growth of various forms of opposition to war hardened the perceived divide between war and peace, so that they were conceived as opposites: here the idea of a just war as a way to peace became an oxymoron, whereas in classic just war thinking the just use of force was conceived as a necessary tool in the service of peace.