tourniquet


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tourniquet

(to͝or`nĭkĕt, –kā, tûr`–), compression device used to cut off the flow of blood to a part of the body, most often an arm or leg. It may be a special surgical instrument, a rubber tube, a strip of cloth, or any flexible material that can be tightened to exert pressure. Compression should not be maintained for more than 20 min at a time because of the danger of congestion and gangrene. In cases of a bleeding emergency, a tourniquet is used to stop the flow of blood if other means, e.g., the application of a pressure bandage to the wound, are not effective. In arterial hemorrhage (bright red blood spurting out in jets) the tourniquet is applied above the wound, i.e., between the wound and the heart. In hemorrhage from a vein (an even flow of dark red blood) the tourniquet is applied below the wound, i.e., away from the heart.

Tourniquet

 

an elastic rubber tube (tape, bandage, cuff, and the like) for temporarily stopping hemorrhage when there is a wound or during an operation.

The various types of tourniquets used are based on constricting the extremities. A properly applied tourniquet must constrict the arterial trunks, otherwise hemorrhage is intensified owing to cessation of outflow of venous blood. A tourniquet is applied either on clothing or on a layer of cloth (a towel). The more elastic the tourniquet, the less it traumatizes the body tissues. A tourniquet is applied for no longer than two hours; during that time it should be loosened two or three times (more often in winter) to restore the circulation. (The artery should be pressed with a finger when the tourniquet is loosened.)

tourniquet

[′tu̇r·nə·kət]
(medicine)
An apparatus for controlling hemorrhage from, or circulation in, a limb or part of the body, where pressure can be brought upon the blood vessels by means of straps, cords, rubber tubes, or pads.

tourniquet

Med any instrument or device for temporarily constricting an artery of the arm or leg to control bleeding
References in periodicals archive ?
Ninety-seven cases (57%) were performed with the use of a tourniquet with an average tourniquet time ([+ or -] SD) of 44.
The question of safety is relevant in the case of the Bier block, especially with regard to use of the pneumatic pressure tourniquet, and the use of high dose lidocaine (1.
If the entire limb is not exposed, apply the tourniquet over clothing as proximally as possible.
The kit also comes with two removable tourniquet pouches that can be mounted to the kit, or to other parts of a Soldier's gear.
As a result, the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and Fort Belvoir Community Hospital in Bethesda will begin using the HemaClear tourniquet device, and will have it readily available to treat military orthopedic patients.
If we hadn't made the tourniquet I'd have been a goner," the Sun quoted him as saying on Wednesday.
A British man, who was mauled by a shark while swimming in South Africa, was saved by quick-thinking bystanders who applied a makeshift tourniquet from a wetsuit and two belts.
He paid tribute to those who saved Mr Cohen's life, saying: "That tourniquet has consisted of a wetsuit applied around the thigh and wrapped around with two belts very, very tightly.
Each outpatient tourniquet was used on an average of 33 patients and each inpatient tourniquet was used on an average of 11 patients.
We present a case of fatal pulmonary embolism after release of a thigh tourniquet following lower limb orthopaedic surgery.