town


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town,

in the United States. In the New England states the town is the basic unit of local governmentlocal government,
political administration of the smallest subdivisions of a country's territory and population. Characteristics and Types

Although there are special-purpose local government bodies (e.g.
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. The New England town government's unique feature is the town meeting, much praised as a nearly pure form of democracy. At the annual meeting of voters, town officers are elected and local issues such as town tax rates are decided. Elsewhere in the United States the term town has little political use, signifying only a place incorporated as a town or simply a population center. However, township has legal meaning—a geographical division of the countycounty
[Fr., comté,=domain of a count], division of local government in the United States, Great Britain, and many Commonwealth countries. The county developed in England from the shire, a unit of local government that originated in the Saxon settlements of the 5th
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, established in land surveys and usually made up of 36 sections, each with roughly an area of 1 sq mi (2.6 sq km). Except in the Middle Atlantic states, townships are seldom units of local government.

Town

A concentration of residential and related buildings surrounded by countryside; typically smaller than a city and larger than a village.

town

1. 
a. a densely populated urban area, typically smaller than a city and larger than a village, having some local powers of government and a fixed boundary
b. (as modifier): town life
2. a city, borough, or other urban area
3. (in the US) a territorial unit of local government that is smaller than a county; township
4. the nearest town or commercial district
5. London or the chief city of an area
6. the inhabitants of a town
References in classic literature ?
My town is just like a bottle; and one gets in by the neck, and by the neck one must get out again
Sorbe, a very quiet little town, beautifully situated, surrounded by woods and lakes.
When Ambrosch came to town, however, he came alone, and though he put his horses in our barn, he would never stay for dinner, or tell us anything about his mother and sisters.
Here the conversation was interrupted by a water-cart lumbering past us, for we were now come to the busy part of the sands; and, for the next eight or ten minutes, between carts and horses, and asses, and men, there was little room for social intercourse, till we had turned our backs upon the sea, and begun to ascend the precipitous road leading into the town.
You don't often come on to the sands, I think,' said he, 'for I have walked there many times, both morning and evening, since I came, and never seen you till now; and several times, in passing through the town, too, I have looked about for your school--but I did not think of the--Road; and once or twice I made inquiries, but without obtaining the requisite information.
In his youth Wing Biddlebaum had been a school teacher in a town in Pennsylvania.
One afternoon a man of the town, Henry Brad- ford, who kept a saloon, came to the schoolhouse door.
I've read a few rigmaroles that might have come from this very town.
But the dogs and the cats and the children still ran up and followed him through the town --the same as they had done when he was rich.
Her mother was sitting by the fireside spinning her purple yarn with her maids around her, and she happened to catch her father just as he was going out to attend a meeting of the town council, which the Phaeacian aldermen had convened.
Ride on, my merry men all, and let us get back to Nottingham Town as speedily as we may.
She had read the letter to the family, and Rowena had danced away to see to the cleaning and airing of the room by the slave woman, Nancy, and the boys had rushed abroad in the town to spread the great news, for it was a matter of public interest, and the public would wonder and not be pleased if not informed.