traffic


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traffic

1. 
a. the business of commercial transportation by land, sea, or air
b. the freight, passengers, etc., transported
2. trade, esp of an illicit or improper kind
3. Chiefly US the number of customers patronizing a commercial establishment in a given time period

traffic

[′traf·ik]
(communications)
The messages transmitted and received over a communication channel.
(engineering)
The passage or flow of vehicles, pedestrians, ships, or planes along defined routes such as highways, sidewalks, sea lanes, or air lanes.

traffic

Data transmitted over a network. Traffic is a very general term and typically refers to overall network usage at a given moment. However, it can refer to specific transactions, messages, records or users in any kind of data or telephone network. See PPS.
References in classic literature ?
The founders of the greater part of the families which now compose the aristocracy of Salem might here be traced, from the petty and obscure beginnings of their traffic, at periods generally much posterior to the Revolution, upward to what their children look upon as long-established rank,
I know that a great many empty bottles were one of the consequences of this traffic, and that certain men and boys were employed to examine them against the light, and reject those that were flawed, and to rinse and wash them.
It was a little past mid-day when the fourhorse stage-coach by which I was a passenger, got into the ravel of traffic frayed out about the Cross Keys, Wood-street, Cheapside, London.
He that would live by traffic, must hold himself at the disposal of every one claiming business with him.
Therefore, in hopes to defray some of the charges he must be at, he bought a sloop, loaded it with several sorts of goods, wherewith the Tonquinese usually trade to the neighbouring islands, and putting fourteen men on board, whereof three were of the country, he appointed me master of the sloop, and gave me power to traffic, while he transacted his affairs at Tonquin.
On the other hand, I soon discovered the curious moral traffic established between the monster and Christine Daae.
The island on which I found myself was full of people, and abounded in all sorts of desirable things, and a great deal of traffic went on in the capital, where I soon began to feel at home and contented.
The manner of eating in Abyssinia, their dress, their hospitality, and traffic.
And just as the particles of a human body change every six or seven years, without disturb- ing the body, so the particles of our telephone systems have changed repeatedly without any interruption of traffic.
The wars of these two last-mentioned nations have in a great measure grown out of commercial considerations, -- the desire of supplanting and the fear of being supplanted, either in particular branches of traffic or in the general advantages of trade and navigation, and sometimes even the more culpable desire of sharing in the commerce of other nations without their consent.
Spain thinks it convenient to shut the Mississippi against us on the one side, and Britain excludes us from the Saint Lawrence on the other; nor will either of them permit the other waters which are between them and us to become the means of mutual intercourse and traffic.
It ought to be considered as a great point gained in favor of humanity, that a period of twenty years may terminate forever, within these States, a traffic which has so long and so loudly upbraided the barbarism of modern policy; that within that period, it will receive a considerable discouragement from the federal government, and may be totally abolished, by a concurrence of the few States which continue the unnatural traffic, in the prohibitory example which has been given by so great a majority of the Union.