traffic

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traffic

1. 
a. the business of commercial transportation by land, sea, or air
b. the freight, passengers, etc., transported
2. trade, esp of an illicit or improper kind
3. Chiefly US the number of customers patronizing a commercial establishment in a given time period

traffic

[′traf·ik]
(communications)
The messages transmitted and received over a communication channel.
(engineering)
The passage or flow of vehicles, pedestrians, ships, or planes along defined routes such as highways, sidewalks, sea lanes, or air lanes.

traffic

Data transmitted over a network. Traffic is a very general term and typically refers to overall network usage at a given moment. However, it can refer to specific transactions, messages, records or users in any kind of data or telephone network. See PPS.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you are caught in a traffic jam and thinking to yourself: 'I wish I could just let my car drive me home', soon that wish will come true, said Gring.
It is not possible for us to allow the public to get stuck in traffic jams for a long time.
Our aim with the traffic jam assistance is to make commuting a bit less stressful for the driver," added Mertens.
But researchers looking for a new way to study some kinds of traffic jams say that they behave more like gas explosions.
So far she has found out how one traffic jam can cause another and how it takes about the same time to get out of each one.
The traffic jam between next to transport vehicles is described by formula
However moving on I made good progress past Bishopsgarth only to run in to the traffic jam at the Roseworth and Hardwick roundabout, though this did give me good time to read the lovely signs telling me about the rebuilding of Hardwick.
Fast forward to the future, set in present day, as she is being interviewed about a play she is producing inspired by events around that traffic jam.
Bad driving causes many of the traffic jams on Britain's roads and adds massively to the soaring cost of congestion.
On top of that, given that the number of visitors to the city will only increase as we draw nearer to 2008, I would have thought the desired first impression should not be one of traffic jams.
The exercises can only be done when the car is stationary, of course,but when you are sitting in a traffic jam a few stretches and deep breathing may just help keep you calm.
But until Tuesday I'd never been in a traffic jam on the runway of an airport.