trailing edge

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Related to trailing edges: leading edge

trailing edge

See preceding.

trailing edge

[′trāl·iŋ ′ej]
(aerospace engineering)
The rear section of a multipiece airfoil, usually that portion aft of the rear spar.
(electronics)
The major portion of the decay of a pulse.

trailing edge

The aft edge of an airfoil or a wing. Air passes last over this portion of the airfoil. See leading edge.
References in periodicals archive ?
Owls, however, possess no fewer than three distinct physical attributes that are thought to contribute to their silent flight capability: a comb of stiff feathers along the leading edge of the wing; a soft downy material on top of the wing; and a flexible fringe at the trailing edge of the wing.
The researchers attempted to unravel this mystery by developing a theoretical basis for the owl's ability to mitigate sound from the trailing edge of its wing, which is typically an airfoil's dominant noise source.
Each trailing edge is 36 metres long and is being delivered in four sections each, because of its size, requiring a purpose-built lorry.
The processing of leading and trailing edges is ideally suited to mechanical surface finishing process because of the true radius produced, but care must be taken to maintain the chordal width of the blade.
At some point, the blades become too thin to do that, so they peel off some skin at the end of the blade and let the air run over the trailing edge," said Benson.
For takeoffs and landings, the leading and trailing edges curve downward; in normal flight, both edges are slightly less curved; and at high speeds, the airfoil is flattened, with the leading edge pointing slightly upward.
The final test took place on 21 April, when the wing and trailing edges were subjected to their limit load.
Several research studies have shown that blunt trailing edge (flatback) airfoils have a larger moment of inertia and manufacture facilities, in addition to an aerodynamic performance as good as the one shown by the use of common airfoils [4-15].