quantitative trait

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quantitative trait

[‚kwänt·ə‚tād·iv ′trāt]
(genetics)
A trait that is under the control of many factors, both genetic and environmental, each of which contributes only a small amount to the total variability of the trait.
References in classic literature ?
As most of these old Custom-House officers had good traits, and as my position in reference to them, being paternal and protective, was favourable to the growth of friendly sentiments, I soon grew to like them all.
Every trait which the artist recorded in stone he had seen in life, and better than his copy.
Like many other of his traits and mannerisms this was the result of environment rather than heredity or reversion, and even though he was outwardly a man, the Englishman and the girl were both impressed with the naturalness of the act.
I was surprised, and joyfully, that she was so much the woman, and the display of each trait and mannerism that was characteristically feminine gave me keener joy.
But, you see, a body never knows what traits poverty might bring out in 'em.
She could discover in him none of those brilliant and promising traits which Gaston, her husband, had often assured her that he possessed.
His gold-headed cane, too,--a serviceable staff, of dark polished wood,--had similar traits, and, had it chosen to take a walk by itself, would have been recognized anywhere as a tolerably adequate representative of its master.
But other forces had been at work in Rebecca, and the traits of unknown forbears had been wrought into her fibre.
Austin Gore, a man possessing, in an eminent degree, all those traits of character in- dispensable to what is called a first-rate overseer.
For the rest of his character and habits, they were marked, as far as Elinor could perceive, with no traits at all unusual in his sex and time of life.
Why, to tell long stories, showing how I have spoiled my life through morally rotting in my corner, through lack of fitting environment, through divorce from real life, and rankling spite in my underground world, would certainly not be interesting; a novel needs a hero, and all the traits for an anti-hero are expressly gathered together here, and what matters most, it all produces an unpleasant impression, for we are all divorced from life, we are all cripples, every one of us, more or less.
He endeavored to summon up the por- traits which he had seen in his volume, and to place them, like living figures, in the empty seat.