Transcendence


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Transcendence

 

a philosophical term that designates—in contrast to immanence—what is beyond the world of phenomena and is inaccessible to theoretical cognition. The term was used in this sense by I. Kant in the works of his critical period (see Soch., vol. 3, Moscow, 1964, p. 338). Kant distinguishes—although not always consistently—the transcendent from the transcendental. God, the soul, and immortality are regarded by Kant as transcendent; in his view, while transcendent objects lie beyond the bounds of theoretical cognition, they can be apprehended by faith, supported by the postulates of practical reason. The concept of transcendence has no place in Marxist philosophy.

References in periodicals archive ?
Piety's essential characteristic is concern for transcendence.
Transcendence shows to tell that its viewers' reception and feedback are not collectively the same.
As a film of ideas, Transcendence is powerful; as a film per se, it's not so successful.
Transcendence is the story of a man, Dr Will Caster (Depp), who has been masterminding the move to develop a kind of artificial intelligence that will be far more capable than the human brain.
It's not the best piece of sci- fi coming out of Hollywood lately but Transcendence works as a onetime watch.
Vertical transcendence is the pagan or aristocratic mode of representing the transcendent in the "higher" and the "noble"; horizontal transcendence is the Christian and post-Christian form that places the transcendent beyond human reach while also pointing to future fulfillment.
Coming first in the Self Transcendence 24 Hour race has been surreal.
In the three stages of Pareyson's philosophy we find the same dimension of thought, inherited from Kierkegaard, according to which existence is paradoxical coincidence of relation with oneself and relation with other, of temporality and eternity, of auto-relation and hetero-relation, of existence and transcendence, of interpretation and truth, of choosing itself and being chosen, that is to say, of liberty as beginning and at the same time choice.
Yet there is a deeper problem--a problem that is, perhaps, the central issue of Henry's philosophical works: namely, in raising transcendence to the level of universal category, one neglects the primacy of immanence.
Chapter 1 explains sacred transcendence as any reality "other than anything else that is in any other way other than ourselves" and so constitutes ultimate being, power, and goodness (p.
He further suggests that this should be viewed as exteriorization, providing space for transcendence in the realm of language.