transcendent

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transcendent

1. 
a. (in the philosophy of Kant) beyond or before experience; a priori
b. (of a concept) falling outside a given set of categories
c. beyond consciousness or direct apprehension
2. Theol (of God) having continuous existence outside the created world
3. free from the limitations inherent in matter
4. Philosophy a transcendent thing
References in periodicals archive ?
between the spy and the lover to mean that the poet serves to articulate the transcendency of things by loving them, by invoking a thing's necessity, its beauty; it is the very transcendency of the nature of things to suffer the lover.
Taking infinity as a new ideational space, produced by the transcendency with which Christianity confronted its believers, we should say that this space came to be phrased in the early Middle Ages with a perceptible diversity of skills.
73) Accordingly, in his opening address at Sydney's International Eucharistic Congress in 1928, Cardinal Cerretti spoke of the congress as testimony of Christ's "reign" through the Blessed Sacrament: "This is the power of the Blessed Sacrament, formidable in its transcendency, and it is before the Sacred Presence of Christ the King, in the Sacrament of the Altar that we prostrate ourselves in admiration.
After the Fall the desire for transcendence, for being that previously was met in an imitation of God is directed to one's neighbour in an act of deviated transcendency.
No to spectacle no to virtuosity no to transformation and magic and make-believe no to the glamour and transcendency of the star image no to the heroic no to the antiheroic no to trash imagery no to involvement of performer and spectator not to style no to camp no to seduction of spectator by the wiles of the performer no to eccentricity no to moving or being moved.
Semiotics: from immanency to transcendency (matters of style).
To replace the term post-postmodernism, Raoul Eshelman coins the term performatism, to characterize conditions "in which subject, sign, and thing come together in ways that create an aesthetic experience of transcendency," in which new meaning is created.
Transhumanist utopias and dystopias are concerned with various forms of such technological transcendency.
NO to spectacle no to virtuosity no to transformations and magic and make-believe no to the glamour and transcendency of the star image no to the heroic no to the anti-heroic no to trash imagery no to involvement of performer or spectator no to style no to camp no to seduction of spectator by the wiles of the performer no to eccentricity no to moving or being moved.
This term, "deviated transcendency," indicates that the subject must die to his or her metaphysical obsession to be divine (307), the "Promethean pride" (300) to subsume or assume the place of the mediator of desire who is "secretly revered" as a "demigod" 13).
I]t would totally destroy all the benefit, and the very end of the habeas corpus," pleaded Serjeant Glynn, "if the transcendency of any power whatever could blind the eyes of a Court of Justice, and prevent their inquiry into its acts; such a decision by Judges sworn to administer faithfully the laws, would; he declared, "be fatal to every thing that is worth preserving in our boasted constitution.
Also interviewed are scientists who accept the possibility of transcendency including Paul Davies and Jane Goodall.