transcendent

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transcendent

1. 
a. (in the philosophy of Kant) beyond or before experience; a priori
b. (of a concept) falling outside a given set of categories
c. beyond consciousness or direct apprehension
2. Theol (of God) having continuous existence outside the created world
3. free from the limitations inherent in matter
4. Philosophy a transcendent thing
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet, she was also expressing her concerns that their love might not be transcendently spiritual, that there might be a sinful, impure component to it.
As Holmes says of injecting morphine and cocaine: "I find it so transcendently stimulating and clarifying to the mind that its secondary action (the danger to the body) is a matter of small moment.
His companion noted the remarkable beauty of a fifteen year-old girl, suggesting "what celebrity a woman so transcendently beautiful .
Yet, mysteriously, inexplicably, transcendently, God was at work in judgment and redemption.
Shorter's playing is supremely individual and transcendently lovely, his arrangements are surely the most sophisticated in modern jazz and the players are from the top drawer.
Human sexuality is also problematic for the same reason it is transcendently wonderful: it is fundamentally about the imagination.
The early commentators postulated non-Indigenous, literate culture sources for the Wanjina, clearly indicating their desire to seek out the signs of a super-intelligent, transcendently rational culture, cherishing the essentially narcissistic hope (as many science fiction writers also do) of finding an 'intelligent life form' amidst the debris of the world they are in the process of colonising.
The nature of Christian mission is to confess "hope in action," not merely transcendently but in and for this world.
The man himself and his corpus of writings--which are transcendently works of genius--remain tantalizing and enigmatic, susceptible to multiple interpretations, thereby assuring the industry's productivity for generations to come.
These and other profound questions are the substance of Hirokazu Kore-eda's brilliant, humorous, transcendently compassionate film, ``After Life.
Apparently not," remarked the San Jose Mercury News, "which makes this another transcendently clumsy attempt to co-opt a newly popular buzzword and turn it to political advantage.
In the nineteenth century, when the "author" momentarily became transcendently important in literary studies, the theater had to an invent the director, for "the `director' summons the `author' into the discourse of modern performance" (48).