transept


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transept

(trăn`sĕpt'), term applied to the transverse portion of a building cutting its main axis at right angles or to each arm of such a portion. Transepts are found chiefly in churches, where, extending north and south from the main body, they create a cruciform plan. They may consist of a central portion as wide as the church nave, with two side aisles or with only one. The rectangular or square space formed by the intersection with the nave is termed the crossing. The cross-hall of vaulted Roman basilicas probably inspired the builders of early Christian churches. This position of the transept remained unchanged. In Romanesque churches the transept became universal, while the development of vaulting unified it organically with the body of the building. Its height equaled that of the nave, while the heavy piers of the crossing frequently supported an exterior dome or tower. Transepts furnished additional space for altars and chapels. In some French Gothic cathedrals transepts projected only slightly from the building. Their ends, however, were richly emphasized externally, with sculptured portals and rose windows, as at Chartres and Amiens, or with a tower, as at Le Mans. In England the transepts, furnishing practically the only opportunity for altars, were long and of deep projection. The need for still more space resulted in the frequent provision of a second and minor transept farther east, behind the choir, as at Salisbury.

Transept

The space that crosses at a right angle to the nave of a building; may be the same size as the nave in a cruciform building, or larger.

transept

The transverse portion of a church crossing the main axis at a right angle and producing a cruciform plan.

transept

either of the two wings of a cruciform church at right angles to the nave
References in periodicals archive ?
In Ely Cathedral Across the Transepts, the composition, with its use of shadow and light to describe the architectural space, creates an image that lends itself to metaphor.
In the north transept were the Middletons and many of William and Kate's
In the southwest transept, a beautiful stained glass window designed by Evie Hone shows Christ healing Jairus' daughter, and the woman healed from an issue of blood by touching the hem of Christ's robe.
There are two broken windows, one in the vestry and a leaded one in the north transept.
Of a 4th generation Nebraskan woman who navigates humbled visitors through a Capitol towering and stretching out its political and legal gothic bones in the sacred mausoleum darkness of a Saturday late afternoon, of Willa Cather and Wild Bill lining up the Italian and Belgian marbled Hall of Fame into a central nave protected by all 8 virtues offering in the transept wings the East and West Chambers and 2 sets of carved doors through which we all have crossed to arrive here and now, but so often, have chosen to forget: Men and Women of Assyria, tamers of wheat and barley, and Native Americans with fellow otter and turtle, sun and moon.
Before leaving the cathedral, don't miss the astronomical clock in the south transept.
In this magnificently illustrated book, Terry is correctly identified as a Radical Classicist, who uses a rich and infinitely adaptable language of architecture (as opposed to the monosyllabic grunts favoured by his enemies), and is capable of the utmost sensitivity, as in his remodelling of the Church of St Helen, Bishopsgate, London, following the damage it sustained after two explosions caused by the IRA in 1992-3: it was a commission that Terry himself said gave him more satisfaction than any other, and the robust Classical doorcase in the west wall of the south transept demonstrates the radicalism to which Watkin refers in his apt title.
And, while the major work was done during the 1990s, the scaffolding and missing ceiling boards on the north transept show that work continues.
Thus we have recent studies of the chapels of Santa Maria Maggiore, the transept of San Giovanni in Laterano, and now a monograph on one of the most successful painters of the day, Giovanni Baglione.
In the cathedral's nave, Mahony crossed into the transept and showed off the organ, consisting of 6,019 pipes and 183 tin trumpets.
New York Bishop Mark Sisk said he wanted the traditional holiday services to be held in the cathedral's main sanctuary, which was spared from the five-alarm blaze that destroyed the cathedral's gift shop, located in the building's north transept.
One possible solution would be to design the left transept (the north arm of the church in an eastward facing church) of a cruciform-style church to house the chapel.

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