active

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active:

see voicevoice,
grammatical category according to which an action is referred to as done by the subject (active, e.g., men shoot bears) or to the subject (passive, e.g., bears are shot by men). In Latin, voice is a category of inflection like mood or tense.
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active

1. (of a volcano) erupting periodically; not extinct
2. Astronomy (of the sun) exhibiting a large number of sunspots, solar flares, etc., and a marked variation in intensity and frequency of radio emission
3. Commerce
a. producing or being used to produce profit, esp in the form of interest
b. of or denoting stocks or shares that have been actively bought and sold as recorded in the Official List of the London Stock Exchange
4. Electronics
a. containing a source of power
b. capable of amplifying a signal or controlling some function

active

(1) Using some form of, or a greater amount of, electronic processing in a device. For example, "active 3D" glasses contain circuits that constantly synchronize with the monitor in contrast to "passive 3D" glasses that perform no processing. Active matrix displays have a transistor for each subpixel in contrast to their passive matrix counterpart, which uses far fewer transistors. See active 3D and active matrix. Contrast with passive.

(2) Physically involved in work or athletic endeavors. For example, Samsung phones designed for rugged activities are branded as Galaxy Active devices. See Galaxy S.
References in periodicals archive ?
Transfusion guidelines have been available for decades, and both laboratory (1) and hospital accreditation standards (2-4) require or recommend monitoring of transfusion practice according to the institution's defined transfusion criteria.
Current SA obstetric transfusion guidelines recommend antenatal transfusion for patients with symptomatic anaemia and/or with haemoglobin values <6 g/dL, or emergency caesarean section for patients with haemoglobin values <8 g/dL.
However, now, there exists no emergency versions of blood transfusion guidelines according to patients' instant hospitalization state, that is to say, current blood transfusion in emergency still need to be operated based on the ordinary blood transfusion guidelines.
AABB published transfusion guidelines in March in the Annals of Internal Medicine noting that doctors aren't consistent when deciding when to transfuse.
Modern transfusion guidelines in a case of massive hemorrhage after trauma call for transfusing fresh frozen plasma (FFP) at a ratio of FFP to red blood cells (RBCs) of >1:1.
Searches included the keys terms blood transfusion, blood administration, transfusion safety, blood transfusion guidelines, intravenous line patency, and central line patency.
It is therefore important to adhere strictly to transfusion guidelines so as to balance the risk versus benefit see-saw.
There was wide variation in the rate of transfusion between centres in our study, as has been reported elsewhere (26), supporting a need for transfusion guidelines.