translate

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translate

[tran′slāt]
(computer science)
To convert computer information from one language to another, or to convert characters from one representation set to another, and by extension, the computer instruction which directs the latter conversion to be carried out.

translate

(1) To change one language into another; for example, assemblers, compilers and interpreters translate source language into machine language.

(2) In computer graphics, to move an image on screen without rotating it.

(3) In telecommunications, to change the frequencies of a band of signals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sanneh's model also belongs to the communication model in that it emphasizes good translation for promoting mission, mentions the translatability of Christianity and the translation mission, and makes use of the words "expansion" and "efficiency," thus considering cultural diversity as a means of talking about God.
226), which exposes the limits of First World feminism and its lack of translatability for all women--especially those who wear veils while concomitantly exercising agency.
While mixed methods may provide more concrete theories to the question of the translatability of religious horror films across different cultural contexts, the proposed project can still make an addition to future cross-contextual researches as well as similar works that already have been conducted in America.
Smith begins his study in the Late Bronze Age by elaborating on Assmann's recognition that translatability in this era was founded on the westward expansion of the Mesopotamian scribal curriculum and the political context of the great imperial powers.
In the "Conclusion: Resounding Silence," Betjemann discusses craft's expressiveness, translatability, and sensibility, arguing "craft's advocates saw that their advocacy depended on artisanship's translatability to realms outside the workshop and outside the skills of the body .
51) But Shelley and Keats are placed in their double bind by postwar political reality; the same political theory that promotes the translatability of options in the (formerly) political arena, and makes it difficult to imagine intervening in a field of collapsing differences, defines "political action" as "active alteration" within that field.
But the question of the translatability or untranslatability of "Turk"--as common noun or proper name, in terms of faith or betrayal--is no less useful for thinking about Turkey in more recent years; whether in 1934 (when Menard was writing or translating his Dan Quixote, the very year that Turkish parliament adopted the Surname Law and presented the Republic's first President, Mustafa Kemal, with the honorific surname "Ataturk," effectively making "Turk" his proper name); or in 1939 (when "Pierre Menard" is signed by the narrator under the byline, "Nimes, 1939," accusatorily pointing towards Vichy); or in 2011 (when Turkey continues to press its contentious bid to enter the European Union.
Another, controversy related to the debate of theory of un translatability is the notion of Perfectibility.
The divine nature of the Qur'anic text is taken to be a major argument against its translatability.
Revisiting time in translation studies means finding complementarity between a historical metalanguage for the description of translational activity and a semiotic metalanguage to understand the different sides of translatability.
Around labour policy, there is no translatability of a China or US approach to labour and labour flexibility," said Martyn Davies, CEO of Frontier Advisory and an expert on Africa-China relations.
and Philip Holden, Reading Chinese Transnationalisms: Society, Literature, Film (Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2006), 131-42; Felicia Chan, "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: Cultural Migrancy and Translatability," in ed.