transmission loss


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Related to transmission loss: sound transmission loss

transmission loss

[tranz′mish·ən ‚lȯs]
(communications)
The ratio of the power at one point in a transmission system to the power at a point farther along the line; usually expressed in decibels.
The actual power that is lost in transmitting a signal from one point to another through a medium or along a line. Also known as loss.

sound transmission loss, transmission loss, TL

A measure of the sound-insulation value of a partition; the amount, in decibels, by which the intensity of sound is reduced in transmission through the partition.

transmission loss

Of a partition, the number of decibels by which sound (incident on the partition) is reduced in transmission through it; a measure of the sound insulation value of the partition—the higher the number, the greater the insulation value.
References in periodicals archive ?
At frequencies less than the critical frequency the transmission loss is obtained using the relations (4) and (5), and for frequency much higher than the critical frequency, the transmission loss is obtained by adapting relation (6) with the following equation:
Table 2 contains the measured and theoretical transmission loss values as a function of frequency for the dense concrete partition:
Figure 2 illustrates the theroretical and measured values for the transmission loss.
However, because of the transition of the influence of the line resonance, it is relatively large compared to the transmission loss in the high-frequency range.
Several transmission lines with eight different kinds of impedance were measured and analyzed up to 110 GHz in order to separate the transmission loss into dielectric loss, the conductor loss and roughness loss.
Since measuring the transmission loss at that frequency is about 0.
Interestingly, the four-pole parameters can be used to find transmission loss without modeling an anechoic termination.
However, numerical procedures solve for the acoustic quantities at specific frequencies, and the corresponding BEM/FEM results for transmission loss are frequency-specific.
The frequency-specific results for the incident and transmitted powers determined by Equations 8 and 9 were then summed in each one-third octave band before using Equation 1 to determine the transmission loss.
Though the plenum study focused only on transmission loss, transmission loss calculations were supplemented by insertion loss predictions for each elbow.
The maximum transmission loss occurs when the sound pressure at the outlet is low.
6 directed a follow-on investigation where numerical simulation was used to predict the transmission loss of plenums (Herrin et al.

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