Transposition

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transposition

[‚tranz·pə′zish·ən]
(communications)
Interchanging the relative positions of conductors at regular intervals along a transmission line to reduce cross talk.
(mathematics)
A permutation of a set of symbols which exchanges exactly two while leaving all others unaffected.

Transposition

 

in electrical engineering, a change in the relative position of the conductors of individual phases along the length of an overhead power line in order to reduce the undesirable influence of power lines on one another and on nearby communication lines. To make a transposition, an entire power line is arbitrarily divided into sections, the number of which is a multiple of the number of phases. In each successive section the phases change places, so that each phase eventually occupies the positions of the others. The length of a section is determined by the conditions for reliable operation of the power line, the cost of constructing the power line, and the requirements for balance of the power line’s currents and voltages; the balance increases as a result of the equalization of the inductances and capacitances of the power line’s phases in a transposition section. Transpositions are made on power lines that are over 100 km in length and have voltages of 110 or more kilovolts. A complete phase-transposition cycle covers a length of not more than 300 km.

REFERENCE

Mel’nikov.N. A. Elektricheskie seti i sistemy. Moscow, 1975.

Transposition

 

in mathematics, a permutation of the elements of a given set whereby two elements are interchanged. For example, 13452 is transformed into 53412 by a transposition that interchanges the elements 5 and 1. (SeePERMUTATION.)


Transposition

 

in music, the transfer of all the notes of a composition to a designated lower or higher key. Transposition by any interval other than an octave results in a change of key. The purpose of transposition is to adapt musical compositions for performance to a higher or lower voice or to an instrument with a different range. Transposition may also facilitate reading by reducing the number of sharps and flats needed in notation.

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