Treasury

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treasury

1. the revenues or funds of a government, private organization, or individual
2. a place where funds are kept and disbursed

Treasury

(in various countries) the government department in charge of finance. In Britain the Treasury is also responsible for economic strategy

Treasury

 

(1) A depository of money, valuables, and other material wealth of khans, tsars, grand dukes and appanage princes, and monasteries.

(2) In centralized states, the aggregate of financial resources of the state. Through the treasury, the state is legally the holder of certain property rights and interests. Socialist countries haveno need for this concept of a treasury.


Treasury

 

in capitalist countries a special government body in charge of the cash fulfillment of the state budget. The treasury organizes the collection of such state revenues as taxes, fees, customs duties, and the proceeds from sale of state bonds; it also allocates funds to cover budget expenditures. In many instances the treasury issues paper money.

In the USA the Department of the Treasury is the ministry of finance; in France the treasury is set up as the treasury office of the Ministry of Finance, and in Great Britain it is an independent agency. In most capitalist countries, the state makes the central banks of issue responsible for the cash fulfillment of the budget. The “bank system” reduces state expenses for maintaining the treasury administration and facilitates state control over the resources of the budget.

In Russia the treasury was established after 1863 when the department of the state treasury was created within the Ministry of Finance. The treasury exercised control over the local bodies known as financial boards. All revenues collected by the treasury system were registered in one account at the state bank.

There is no treasury in the USSR. Cash fulfillment of the statebudget is accomplished by the Gosbank (State Bank) of the USSR.

A. B. EIDEL’NANT

References in periodicals archive ?
Bridge, or of Custer, or of the many adventurers, alchemists, astronomers, and explorers profiled in The Aztec Treasure House.
An official of Lok Virsa told reporter here on Saturday that the primary purpose of the museum is to educate and edify present and future generations of the country and to create a treasure house for the nation more valuable than the vault of any bank in the world.
The subject of this contract is the implementation of the project "Reconstruction and modernization of Treasure House of Culture" in Ostrava-Poruba.
The sculpture is currently on display at Beverley Art Gallery's Treasure House until October 17.
Find these lovely trees at Captain Kidd's Treasure House, 5268 Old Hwy.
Little Treasures toddler group Every Wednesday at The Bowes Museum, parent and toddler group sessions focus around a fun theme relating to specially chosen objects in the Barnard Castle treasure house.
DADAFEST International 2010 and National Museums Liverpool present a preview performance of Gimp on Monday May 17, 2pm at World Museum Liverpool's Treasure House Theatre.
A family fun day, which will include making fluffy chicks and cards, takes place from 10am on April 3 at the Barnard Castle treasure house in County Durham.
Treasure House, who began the year in a Listed race for Brian Meehan, showed his appreciation of a big drop in class when he landed some good bets under Dominic Fox in the six-furlong conditions event.
Long Melford has a cathedral-like church, which is a treasure house of medieval art and Lavenham has whole streets of half-timbered buildings dating from the 15th century.
Delivering the new manifesto for the BBC, called Building Public Value, he said: 'We look forward to a future where the public have access to a treasure house of digital content.
Or think of the ways in which public museums as a type have produced so many fine buildings from Robert Smirke's formal British treasure house to Piano and Rogers' Pompidou Centre, a celebration of the ever-changing nature of visual culture, intended at first to be much more flickering and dynamic than the building we have now.

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