treating


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treating

[′trēd·iŋ]
(chemical engineering)
Usually, the contacting of a fluid stream (for example, water, sewage, petroleum products, or mixed gases) with chemicals to improve the fluid properties by removing, sequestering, or converting undesirable impurities.
References in periodicals archive ?
Multiple indications for treating diseases such as psoriasis also expanded use.
This ruling was contingent on (1) all shareholders treating the company as an S corporation and (2) the trusts reporting their shares of S income on their fiduciary tax returns.
Food and Drug Administration in late 2004 approved the InSightec equipment for clinical use in treating fibroids.
Eastside resident Ronald Ferrell, 62, said he favors treating the wastewater to the point it can be used on golf courses, parks and other area.
If a physician treating CSOM prescribes an otic drop that is used by more than 50% of his colleagues, is the physician liable for any subsequent drug-related complication?
Medics were treating her by stripping off her clothing and pouring liquids all over her.
Be forewarned that not all study protocols are directly comparable: some look at treating patients during acute disease (symptomatic PHI, i.
Every year, over half a million bifurcation coronary lesions are sub-optimally treated as no commercially available optimized solution exists for treating bifurcation lesions.
Under Section 530(a)(1) of the Revenue Act of 1978, termination of certain employment tax liability is appropriate if a taxpayer (1) did not treat an individual as an employee for any period, (2) consistently treated the individual as a nonemployee on all required Federal tax returns and (3) had a reasonable basis for not treating the individual as an employee.
Thiemann of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, lead author of the recent NEJM study, and his colleagues defined high-volume hospitals as those treating at least 4.
Historically, heat treating services have been viewed by foundrymen as a necessary evil, needed to correct mistake castings or because of customer specifications.
Although it is impossible to make any universal assertions about which approach is more beneficial, in many cases the cost savings from reducing the number of actuarial calculations (and waiting until most factors needed to make these calculations are known) will outweigh the benefits of treating amounts as subject to FICA taxes as of an early inclusion date.