treble

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treble,

highest part in choral music, thus corresponding in pitch to soprano, but associated with the voice of a boy or a girl. The term appeared in 15th-century English polyphony, probably as an anglicization of the Latin triplum, the name given in medieval polyphony to the part that was often the highest (see motetmotet
, name for the outstanding type of musical composition of the 13th cent. and for a different type that originated in the Renaissance. The 13th-century motet, a creation (c.
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). The treble clef, however, is the G clef, one of the two clefs commonly used today for vocal music and for most instrumental music. The soprano clef is a C clef placing middle C on the bottom line of the staff; it was used in vocal music as late as Bach's time but is now nearly obsolete for voice. See musical notationmusical notation,
symbols used to make a written record of musical sounds.

Two different systems of letters were used to write down the instrumental and the vocal music of ancient Greece. In his five textbooks on music theory Boethius (c.A.D. 470–A.D.
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.

Treble

 

(1) A high child’s voice.

(2) Since the 15th century, a term for the highest voice in choral compositions. The treble voice was sung by tenor falsettos and castrati (replacing children’s voices) until the 18th century. In the 19th and 20th centuries the term has come to mean soprano.

(3) A form of medieval polyphony that emerged in the 12th century in France. A higher voice was joined to a Gregorian chant and moved in an opposite direction from the line of the chant. This was the treble voice; subsequently, this form of polyphonic music was called treble.

(4) In the songs of the Don cossacks and in eastern Ukrainian and Byelorussian songs, a voice that embellishes the main voice part with decorative improvisations.

treble

[′treb·əl]
(acoustics)
High audio frequencies, such as those handled by a tweeter in a sound system.

treble

1. of, relating to, or denoting a soprano voice or part or a high-pitched instrument
2. a soprano voice or part or a high-pitched instrument
3. the highest register of a musical instrument
4. 
a. the high-frequency response of an audio amplifier, esp in a record player or tape recorder
b. a control knob on such an instrument by means of which the high-frequency gain can be increased or decreased
5. Bell-ringing the lightest and highest bell in a ring
6. 
a. the narrow inner ring on a dartboard
b. a hit on this ring
References in classic literature ?
said Ben, with a long treble intonation, "what's folks's kin got to do wi't?
Hitherto the traveller had been chained to the spot against his will by the charm of Dinah's mellow treble tones, which had a variety of modulation like that of a fine instrument touched with the unconscious skill of musical instinct.
She had selected "Paradise Lost" from her shelf of classics, thinking, I suppose, the religious character of the book best adapted it to Sunday; I told her to begin at the beginning, and while she read Milton's invocation to that heavenly muse, who on the "secret top of Oreb or Sinai" had taught the Hebrew shepherd how in the womb of chaos, the conception of a world had originated and ripened, I enjoyed, undisturbed, the treble pleasure of having her near me, hearing the sound of her voice--a sound sweet and satisfying in my ear--and looking, by intervals, at her face: of this last privilege, I chiefly availed myself when I found fault with an intonation, a pause, or an emphasis; as long as I dogmatized, I might also gaze, without exciting too warm a flush.
That is to say, after the sixteenth (or so) success of the red, one would think that the seventeenth coup would inevitably fall upon the black; wherefore, novices would be apt to back the latter in the seventeenth round, and even to double or treble their stakes upon it--only, in the end, to lose.
A crowded street-corner suggests itself to their minds as a favorable spot for the discussion of family affairs at a shrill treble.
At any rate, the very fact that the strange, invisible guardians of this weird place had some reason for wishing him not to enter this particular chamber was sufficient to treble Tarzan's desire to do so, and though the shrieking was repeated continuously, he kept his shoulder to the door until it gave before his giant strength to swing open upon creaking wooden hinges.
Are not the doors of double and even of treble strength, and the sentinels ten times more watchful?
It seems to me that they have treble their share of this world's heartache.
Reserve on such a point would be not only useless, but draw down treble misery on us all.
TWO winning trebles last week made it a decent day but Inverness beat the homes as they were held by Killie.
I'll be doing more trebles this season than bigger accumulators and when I get into the swing if it there will be top trebles, both to score trebles and Euro trebles among others.
LADBROKES have now joined the growing list of bookmakers who will offer an each-way service to first-scorer punters and the Magic Sign are also now offering enhanced trebles on their to score at any time prices.