Trebuchet

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Trebuchet

 

a hurling engine with a long arm that pivots between two posts. At one end of the arm is a weight, at the other is a sling or simply a projectile. The trebuchet could hurl a 20-kilogram stone a distance of 100–150 meters. Dating from antiquity, the weapon was used until the 15th century in the siege of fortresses.

References in periodicals archive ?
One old soldier, who had fought in Italy at Garellano and elsewhere, said he knew how to build a trebuchet, the old medieval siege weapon capable of throwing large stones several hundred metres over protective walls.
The trebuchet was designed by Dr Peter Vemming from the Medieval Centre in Nykobing, Denmark.
Tim Harrison Jones, general manager at Warwick Castle, said: "It is an unusual place when you take into consideration the nature of the trebuchet, but the birds are completely undeterred.
IT'S got dragon slayers, dungeons and a Princess Tower, but Warwick Castle has scored a world first with its latest attraction - a female Trebuchet Master.
Catapults were used by the earliest armies but the trebuchet is different as it uses gravity rather than force tension.
What physical factors do you think allow machines like a catapult or trebuchet to hurl objects farther than a person alone can?
The trebuchets, which were made of a combination of wood, tape, screws, nails, string and glue, were judged by Dr John Morton of the ETB and Dr Andrew Cave of the Smallpeice Trust for their aerodynamics, technical accuracy, distance of shot, unique selling point, and marketing plan.
There are a number of 'backyard hobbyists' and more professional researchers occupying themselves with everything connected to medieval warfare, including reconstruction of trebuchets.
Trebuchets are counter-weight-driven hurling machines, very effective for throwing ammunition weighing a hundred kilos or more (22).
In most medieval trebuchets, the machine's backbone was constructed of a tapered wooden beam--sometimes longer than 50 feet--that pivoted on a fulcrum, or axle.
At 16ft high, it is a one quarter copy of the original castle-smashing trebuchets of the type seen at Warwick Castle.
16), you read about the physics behind Punkin Chunkin contestants' trebuchets.