tree kangaroo

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tree kangaroo

any of several arboreal kangaroos of the genus Dendrolagus, of New Guinea and N Australia, having hind and forelegs of a similar length and a long tail
References in periodicals archive ?
Jim and his wife have been working with villagers for more than a decade to protect tree kangaroos and their habitat.
A traditional Sing Sing, or celebratory gathering, honours the recent landmark decision by the Papua New Guinea (PNG) government to approve the Conservation Area, rewarding more than a decade of work by local communities in collaboration with conservation biologists from the Tree Kangaroo Conservation Program (TKCP) based at Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle, USA and Conservation International (CI), as well as the PNG Department of Environment and Conservation, Morobe Provincial Government and the Kabwum District.
Woodland Park Zoo's Tree Kangaroo Conservation Program (TKCP) has worked with YUS landowners and the PNG government for more than 12 years to establish the YUS Conservation Area, which is the first to be declared under the PNG Conservation Areas Act of 1978.
Although hawksbill is listed as endangered and the tree kangaroos are found only in a restricted area, the species that is in need of most support is the golden-shouldered parrot in terms of numbers and distribution (Reader's Digest, 1997b).
Table 6 shows that in Survey I the golden-shouldered parrot (GHP) gets the least average monetary support while tree kangaroos (TK) get the most support which is A$1.
The exhibit featured artwork and letters shared through the Papua New Guinea Art Exchange, a program facilitated by Rhode Island art teachers in conjunction with the Zoo's Tree Kangaroo Conservation Program (TKCP), which is based in Papua New Guinea (PNG).
The TKCP is an award-winning conservation program based at Roger Williams Park Zoo that is dedicated to saving the Matschie's tree kangaroo from extinction.
Fourteen tree kangaroo species are on the Red List, with their status ranging from threatened to critically endangered, which highlights the fact that the species are in an overall decline due to deforestation of their ranges in Australia and New Guinea, as well as hunting.
Due to the success of the YFRW reintroduction, the same methodology is being applied to tree kangaroos in Papua New Guinea where Steven Lapidge is collaborating with Dr.