tree kangaroo

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tree kangaroo

any of several arboreal kangaroos of the genus Dendrolagus, of New Guinea and N Australia, having hind and forelegs of a similar length and a long tail
References in periodicals archive ?
A kangaroo named Paul has become the oldest living tree kangaroo in the country.
Belfast Zoo manager Mark Challis said: "Only 13 zoos internationally are home to Goodfellow's tree kangaroos so the arrival of our joey is spectacular.
Tree kangaroos are the biggest native mammal in Papua New Guinea, so they are highly sought after, noted Jim Thomas, director of Tenkile Conservation Alliance.
The PNG Government's declaration follows years of work in the area by Conservation International (CI) and biologists from the Tree Kangaroo Conservation Program (TKCP) at Seattle's Woodland Park Zoo in the US.
The forest is critical habitat, particularly for Huon (or Matschie's) tree kangaroos, an Endangered species which is one of Earth's unique creatures with a bear-like head, strong arms for climbing and marsupial pouch.
Although hawksbill is listed as endangered and the tree kangaroos are found only in a restricted area, the species that is in need of most support is the golden-shouldered parrot in terms of numbers and distribution (Reader's Digest, 1997b).
In beautiful postcards and drawings, Rhode Island children shared a slice of local life and PNG students responded with their versions of the same--stories of their "tsing-tsings" (culturally symbolic dances), descriptions of the mountains and rainforests, and pictures of tree kangaroos.
There are 43 known species of birds of paradise, over 3,000 species of orchid, 18 species of tree kangaroos and much more.
According to the zoo's director of conservation and research, Lisa Dabek, only about 80 tree kangaroos exist in captivity, and their SSP has been just as focused on field conservation as on captive breeding.
But tree kangaroos move like monkeys through the treetops, looking for leaves to munch.
Species such as tree kangaroos, narwhals and Irrawaddy dolphins are now closer to extinction, say WWF scientists who helped compile the list and work around the world to save endangered species and habitats.
Tree Roo Rescue will receive more than $34, 000 to help rescue and rehabilitate injured or displaced Australian tree kangaroos, while not-for-profit organisation BUSHkids will receive $10, 000 to help provide primary healthcare to children in rural communities.