trellis

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trellis

a structure or pattern of latticework, esp one used to support climbing plants

Trellis

A structural frame supporting an open latticework or grating constructed of either metal or wood, used to support plants or vines or left exposed.

trellis

trellis
1. An open grating or latticework, of either metal or wood.
2. An arbor or framework for the support of vines; a treillage.

Trellis

(1)
An object-oriented language from the University of Karlsruhe(?) with static type-checking and encapsulation.

Trellis

(2)
An object-oriented application development system from DEC, based on the Trellis language. (Formerly named Owl).

E-mail: Jerry Smith <smith@pipe.enet.dec.com>

["Persistent and Shared Objects in trellis/owl", P. O'Brien et al, Proc 1986 IEEE Workshop on Object-Oriented Database Systems, IEEE, NY 1986].
References in periodicals archive ?
Their range of three-dimensional trellises varies from columns, pillars, garden obelisks, pyramids, arches, arbours, pergolas and gazebos to fine, elegant trellis works, including perspective trompe-l'oeil structures.
Twining stems have little use for horizontal lines, so they do best with trellises composed mostly of poles or an upright fence.
If you use three-foot rows, this gives you one foot between trellises.
Although advances in trellising have been few in the most recent years, trellises have certainly become more complex since the ancient Egyptians incorporated them in the hieroglyph representing the grapevine.
Owners Deepa and Joe Alban describe the proprietary process used to cultivate their coffee, "The Arabica trees are grown on trellises similar to those used to nurture fine wine grapes.
In Santiago, westerly facades are particularly vulnerable to solar gain and overheating, so the west elevation is protected by an outer screen of planted trellises.
Graphs similar to Figure 9 are easily constructed for larger trellises.
Other flowering vines for trellises include star jasmine, glory bower (Pandorea), lavender trumpet vine (Clytostigma), blood red trumpet vine (Distictis buccinatoria), yellow Carolina jessamine (Gelsemium), passion flower (Passiflora) as well as climbing roses and bougainvillea.
Plants that benefit from garden trellises use a variety of methods to cling to support, including curling tendrils, twining stems or, in the case of tomatoes, long, ropy branches that form roots in places that touch the ground.
Disguised as dainty tissue-thin pastel posies, they can rapidly climb almost anything in sight - from traditional trellises to magnolia trees.
At planting time, set trellises, tepees, or wire cages in containers to provide support for vining crops--pole beans, cucumbers, and tomatoes.
But the main shading devices are trellises that cover much of the exterior of the house.