triangular pediment

triangular pediment

A pediment having a horizontal cornice and slanting sides that meet in a point at the top so as to form a triangle; also called an angular pediment.
References in classic literature ?
Their eyes swept the empty space between the three domes and the triangular pediment.
The architecture makes references to Roman temples-the rectangular design, the raised podium for the shrine, a triangular pediment above the portico of Doric columns, and an altar of the cult goddess under the skylight.
A cherry picker and crane are being used to remove part of the top triangular pediment area of the frontage.
The entrance features a triangular pediment over the door and classical features opening to an enclosed porch with quarry tile ?
The figures her students sculpt, however, are actually "pediment sculptures," as they are situated above the frieze area on the structure's triangular pediment (roof).
Pancras Church built in London in 1819-22 in Greek Revival style the row of six columns topped by a triangular pediment on the front of the church looks like the front of the temple.
One of its earliest winners, retired engineer Tony Rogers, received the accolade for pursuing his life-long dream to transform his shed into a whitewashed Roman temple, complete with traditional eight-foot columns, a triangular pediment, mosaic tables and embroidered cushions.
To these may be added an antique variant, familiar from antique coins, in which a crowning triangular pediment rests on the outer two supports, as in the 4th-century Missorium of Theodosius, illustrated by Worsley.
Where the wall once stood are now two white Ionic capitals, mounted on plinths, made of glass fibre, and topped by a triangular pediment.
Varying in width, depth, and height, they fill one wall with a sculptural composition of squares, rectangles, and a partially cantilevered triangular pediment.
Pancras Church built in London in 1819-22 in Greek Revival style, the row of six columns topped by a triangular pediment on the front of the church looks like the front of the temple.
Its broad triangular pediment is the most sober of three variants, but to compare it with his two earlier solutions we would need to turn the sheet around 180 degrees, just as Michelangelo himself did each time he explored another possibility.