trichlorophenol


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trichlorophenol

[trī¦klȯr·ō′fē‚nȯl]
(organic chemistry)
C6H2Cl3OH Either of two toxic nonflammable compounds with a phenol aroma: 2,4,5-trichlorophenol is a gray solid, is soluble in alcohol, acetone, and ether, melts at 69°C, and is used as a fungicide and bactericide; 2,4,6-trichlorophenol forms yellow flakes, is soluble in alcohol, acetone, and ether, boils at 248°C, and is used as a fungicide, defoliant, and herbicide; it is also known as 2,4,6-T.
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The most tenacious include a class of halogenated aromatic compounds called trichlorophenols (TCPs).
Mortality rates among trichlorophenol workers with exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin.
On 10 July 1976, an explosion at a trichlorophenol manufacturing plant near Seveso, Italy, resulted in the highest TCDD levels known in human residential populations (Mocarelli et al.
In July 1976, a trichlorophenol plant explosion near Seveso, Italy, resulted in dioxin contamination of the surrounding area.
In this study, we assessed the association between human dioxin exposure in utero and during breast-feeding and adverse human adult male reproductive outcomes, as measured in men whose mothers were exposed to dioxin as a result of the trichlorophenol plant explosion near Seveso, Italy, in July 1976 (Mocarelli et al.
Young rationalizes in this book that the omission of maximum dioxin contaminant levels from the military specifications for herbicide quality occurred because not enough was known and measurement was difficult; but two decades ago his edited volume stated that "the manufacturers of trichlorophenol and of 2,4,5-T had been aware for many years that this class of compounds and particularly their impurities produced a toxic reaction in humans .