trim

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trim

1. the upholstery and decorative facings, as on the door panels, of a car's interior
2. Nautical
a. the general set and appearance of a vessel
b. the difference between the draught of a vessel at the bow and at the stern
c. the fitness of a vessel
d. the position of a vessel's sails relative to the wind
e. the relative buoyancy of a submarine
3. the attitude of an aircraft in flight when the pilot allows the main control surfaces to take up their own positions
4. Films a section of shot cut out during editing

Trim

the county town of Meath, Republic of Ireland; 12th-century castle, medieval cathedral; textiles and machinery. Pop.: 5894 (2002)

Trim

The visible woodwork on moldings, such as baseboards, cornices, and casings around doors and windows; any visible element, which covers or protects joints, edges, or ends of another material.

Trim

 

the incline of a vessel to a longitudinal plane. Trim refers to the position (sitting) of a vessel in the water and is determined by the difference between the vessel’s aft (stern) and forward (bow) drafts. If the difference is equal to zero, the vessel is said to “sit on an even keel”; when the difference is positive, the vessel is trim by the stern, and when the difference is negative, the vessel is trim by the bow. Trim affects such things as the vessel’s maneuverability, the screw propeller operating conditions, and ice navigability. Vessel trim may be either static or running, which develops at fast travel speeds. Vessel trim is usually regulated by the intake or discharge of water ballast. [g-975-i]

trim

[trim]
(aerospace engineering)
The orientation of an aircraft relative to the airstream, as indicated by the amount of control pressure required to maintain a given flight performance.
(electronics)
Fine adjustment of capacitance, inductance, or resistance of a component during manufacture or after installation in a circuit.
(naval architecture)
The deviation of a ship from an even keel fore and aft.
To add or remove water from the variable ballast tanks of a submarine to maintain neutral buoyancy.

trim

1. The visible woodwork or moldings of a room, such as the baseboards, cornices, casings, etc.
2. Any visible element, usually of metal or

trimstone, trim

In masonry, the stone used as decorative members on a structure built or faced largely with other masonry material, as brick, tile, block, or terra-cotta; includes sills, jambs, lintels, coping, cornices, and quoins.

trim

i. To adjust trim tabs to zero-out control forces to keep an aircraft flying in a certain configuration.
ii. The attitude of the longitudinal axis of an aerostat, especially with respect to the horizontal.
iii. The process of using a trim curve to check the rated output of an engine. It involves operating the engine near takeoff power and obtaining readings of the turbine gas temperature in accordance with the engine trim chart.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grove knows how to play to the fantasies of baby boomers who remember when they fit trimly into their Che T-shirts.
Have you ever noticed in those glossy, fancy holster catalogs all the models are well-starched, nary a hair out of place and the leather they sport fits trimly, with no bulges, droopy pants or pot bellies getting in the way?
Set against a scenic backdrop, the trimly presented track, with all the buildings smartly painted in its green-and-white livery and the hedge- sculpted horse and rider in the mounded parade ring, has a real sense of identity.
Thomas Nashe goes so far as to charge Puritan Martin with androgyny, in a sentence that mocks the Maid Marian of Puritan legend: in Martin's "May-game," "Martin himselfe is the Maydmarian, trimly drest uppe in a cast Gowne, and a kercher of Dame Lawsons, his face handsomlie muffled with a Diaper-napkin to cover his beard.
Victor/Victoria's use of sexual ambiguity as a metaphor for emotional ambivalence is carried through in Rob Marshall's inventive choreography, which eschews stereotypical drag-show flamboyance in favor of gender-bending mystery - in a hilarious tango sequence that has Victoria partnering Norma with Valentino-like panache; in a stylized apache ballet featuring sinewy, sexually indeterminate bodies stalking and slithering around a dimly lit cabaret: and in the glitzy finale, which features men and women in trimly tailored gold-and-white tailcoats and high heels, playfully trading dandified bows and dainty curtsies back and forth as they belt out the brassy title tune: "She spreads confusion/Her illusion is serene/Behind the screen/Is he a king or is she a queen?
On the main floor the tedium is relieved in three ways: in the buildup of single pallets, where workers arrange many small packages trimly in eight-by-ten-foot-square loads, at heights to fit either the upper or lower deck of a particular aircraft, and with one top edge rounded slightly to conform to the curve of the plane's sidewall; by the loading of oddly shaped or remarkable objects--a matched set of four dark blue Porsche 911s, a prefabricated California ranch-style home; and by the sheer variety of goods--bins of chilled horse meat, Persian carpets, diplomatic mail bound in sisal twine and sealed with red wax, bear testicles, museum art exhibitions, cases of explosives.
As to the woman herself, a prototypical citizen of Outerbridgian physical culture: trimly zaftig, naturally statuesque.
Shakespeare causes Hotspur to pour scorn on the appearanc and costume of the coxcomb, a character who is "neat and trimly dressed" (33), shaved, perfumed, "fresh as a bridegroom" (34), "perfumed like a milliner" (36) Moreover, Hotspur says,