Tripartite scheme

Tripartite scheme

A type of design for a multistory commercial building often associated with the work of Louis Sullivan. The building’s facade is characterized by three major divisions: a base, consisting of the lower three stories; a cap, of one to three stories; and a shaft, consisting of the floors between the base and the cap.

tripartite scheme

A type of design for a multistory commercial building, often associated with the work of Louis H. Sullivan (1856–1924). The building’s façade is characterized by three principal divisions: a base consisting of the lowest two or three stories of the building; a cap, consisting of one to four stories, at the top of the building, and a shaft, consisting of the floors between the base and the cap. Such a building has a flat roof, projecting eaves, imposing arched or round-topped windows, vertical strips of windows separated by massive mullions, and massive arched doorways. In Sullivan’s designs, the decorative elements typically consist of highly ornate friezes with interwoven foliated designs in low relief (particularly in terra-cotta) that usually appear in spandrels, 1 and over entrances. See Sullivanesque.
References in periodicals archive ?
Luhmann, Granschloss is able to show in a first, highly theoretical chapter, some of the shortcomings of the classical tripartite scheme of exclusivism, inclusivism, and pluralism in response to the religious other, suggesting instead a more differentiated model of interreligious hermeneutics and perceptions, which not only includes the further categories of "exotieism/inferiorism" and "modality" but also suggests a much more nuanced tonality to address a multidimensional array of possibilities in interreligious hermeneutics.
True to the critique of the tripartite scheme in the first chapter, Grunschloss takes issue with John Hick's and others' definition of pluralism, which he perceives, true to his methodology, as "Inclusivism on a meta-systems level.
Here he finds a similar tripartite scheme, but now the first thanksgiving has been replaced by a series of christological motifs drawn from the paschal homilies of the second century.
Second, he seems to force all of the anaphoras he treats into a tripartite scheme and appears entirely to dismiss the research on the origins of thanksgiving sacrifice (zebach todah) made popular by C.