triphenyltetrazolium chloride

triphenyltetrazolium chloride

[trī¦fen·əl¦te·trə′zō·lē·əm ′klȯr‚īd]
(organic chemistry)
C19H15ClN4 A crystalline compound, soluble in water, alcohol, and acetone; used as a sensitive reagent for reducing sugars. Also known as red tetrazolium.
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1% triphenyltetrazolium chloride and incubated for 10 min at 37[degrees]C.
The upper layer consisted of Middlebrook 7H10 agar medium (Oxoid) along with added antibiotics, antifungal agents to avoid contamination; triphenyltetrazolium chloride was used to indicate the growth of bacteria by its change of colour on reduction.
The researchers found that exposing Campylobacter to low levels of triphenyltetrazolium chloride does not harm its growth, yet stains the colonies deep red to magenta.
Line has determined that exposing Campylobacter to low levels of the chemical triphenyltetrazolium chloride does not harm growth, yet stains the colonies deep red to magenta.
Relative root activity was evaluated by measuring dehydrogenase activity with triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) reduction technique (Knievel, 1973).
Triphenyltetrazolium chloride as an indicator of fine-root vitality and environmental stress in coniferous forest stands: application and limitations.
Triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) was purchased from Sigma Diagnostics (St.
The researchers have found that exposing Campylobacter to low levels of triphenyltetrazolium chloride does not harm its growth, yet stains the colonies deep red to magenta.
Root mortality was quantified by measuring root dehydrogenase activity using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) reduction technique (Knievel, 1973; Joslin and Henderson, 1984).
Refinement of the triphenyltetrazolium chloride method of determining cold injury.
The researchers have determined that exposing Campylobacter to low levels of triphenyltetrazolium chloride does not harm its growth, yet stains the colonies deep red to magenta.
As a measure of root vitality, dehydrogenase activity was determined using the triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) reduction technique (Knievel, 1973; Joslin and Henderson, 1984).