tropospheric wave


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tropospheric wave

[¦trōp·ə¦sfir·ik ′wāv]
(communications)
A radio wave that is propagated by reflection from a region of abrupt change in dielectric constant or its gradient in the troposphere.

tropospheric wave

tropospheric wave
A radio wave that is propagated by reflection from a place of abrupt change in the dielectric constant or its gradient in the troposphere. In some cases, the ground wave may be so altered that new components appear to arise from reflections in regions of rapidly changing dielectric constants; when these components are distinguishable from the other components, they are called tropospheric waves.
References in periodicals archive ?
Xenos, "Parabolic equation solution of tropospheric wave propagation using FEM," Progress In Electromagnetics Research, Vol.
This is consistent with dynamic theories because warm polar waters would reduce the temperature contrast between the cold poles and the warm equator that is needed to drive tropospheric wave activity.
Princeton's Mahlman hypothesizes that changes in the weather patterns, specifically in the activity of tropospheric waves, have altered the winds, temperatures and ozone levels in the stratosphere.
The tropospheric waves whirl the air up and out of the top of a column, lowering air pressure at the sea surface.
Pfeffer and Challa found that cloud clusters and depressions required tropospheric waves in order to form into hurricanes in the model.