trouble


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trouble

a. political unrest or public disturbances
b. the Troubles political violence in Ireland during the 1920s or in Northern Ireland since the late 1960s
References in classic literature ?
It was hard work for him to leave her--hard to think that he should not know for days how she was bearing her trouble.
No, papa," said the poor thing, feeling as if trouble were not anything she had before experienced, but some invisible power with an iron grasp that made her soul faint within her.
We fear, though, that we shall have much trouble in earning a living for ourselves.
To avoid trouble and confusion, I have taken my pupils one by one, and discussed their various qualities; but this can give no adequate idea of being worried by the whole three together; when, as was often the case, all were determined to 'be naughty, and to tease Miss Grey, and put her in a passion.
The whole of the work fell to my share, and with great trouble I succeeded in obtaining the concessions we were working for.
With the going below of Skipper, evidently in great trouble, the light had gone out of the day for Jerry.
I see he had a still on an' I didn' wanna giv 'im no stuff, so I says: 'Git deh hell outa here an' don' make no trouble,' I says like dat
She would n't have believed it of Tom; it was all the doings of that horrid Trix; well, she would n't trouble him any more, if he was such a snob as to be ashamed of her just because she carried bundles and worked for her bread.
That is a trouble which I cannot cure, my child; but I shall try to make you feel it less.
The trouble with you, Anne, is that you're thinking too much about yourself.
They bring trouble and discomfort wherever they come, with their false, fair faces and their deceitful tongues.
Tis old fat Louis I stand by, an' trouble enough it'll be.