trussed rafter

trussed rafter

[′trəst ′raf·tər]
(building construction)
A triangulated beam in a trussed roof.
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The timber trade sectors covered by the TTBS charity criteria includes companies engaged in the trading and distribution of wood-based products, such as timber importers and agencies, timber merchants, timber-based sheet material importers and merchants and, more recently, Trussed Rafter Association fabricator member companies and accredited timber preservative processing companies with employees involved with treatment of bulk timbers for the above end users.
The Trussed Rafter Association, in collaboration with HSE, has developed a product datasheet entitled 'Health & Safety policy for the loading, haulage, delivery and erection of trussed rafters on site--a definition of responsibilities'.
A THE standard prefabricated trussed rafter system is made up of lots of cross pieces that give very little storage room.
A modern trussed rafter roof might appear more difficult - but an architect, builder or loft conversion specialist will be able to advise.
If, however, your property was built after 1960 then it is likely that the roof was constructed using prefabricated trussed rafters, which means, due to the intricate network of struts and bracing timbers, it might not be as easily used.
Wolverhampton-based Connect PR's remit covers trade and consumer communications of the company's range of timber products, from trussed rafters and performance doors to summerhouses and pavilions.
The Stockton firm, which makes up to 1,500 trussed rafters a week, ensures its timber comes only from well-managed forests.
But since the 1960s most roofs have been built from trussed rafters - factory assembled triangles which are usually lower, with more struts.
The old roof of trusses, purlins and rafters, as you will find in virtually every larger 1930s semi, had to be replaced but instead of using the same form of construction they used modern trussed rafters.
The result was on one property the rafters were starting to go green mouldy, in another the galvanised metal nail plates which hold the sections of the trussed rafters together were starting to corrode and break down, while the third was experiencing damp staining to the ceiling beneath where the condensing moisture had been running down the underside of the felt, dripping on to the insulation and soaking down to the plasterboard ceiling.
The firm, which designs, makes and fits trussed rafters to houses, made profits of around pounds 24,000 in the year to the end of March.