Truth-Value


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Truth-Value

 

(in logic), the value that a proposition assumes, relative to the content reflected in it. In ordinary (classical) logic two truth-values are used—“true” and “false.” In many-valued logic propositions are examined that can assume a greater number of truth values; for example, in three-valued logic there are three truth-values, which may be interpreted as “true,” “false,” or “indeterminate.”

References in periodicals archive ?
That both truth-values are possible is another part of the logical prejudice that Dahlstrom has anatomized in his book.
There exists at least one (n + 1)-order function so that the (n + 2)-order function with the (n + 1)-order argument, and (n + 1)-order function with the n-order argument and the (n + 2)-order function with the n-order argument are all true and their truth-value is equal to the truth-value of the function which is constituted so that the argument of the (n + 1)-order function, the n-order function, has the (n + 2)-order function as an attribute.
I have already mentioned that we are able to decide about the truth-value of any statement with regards to a particular possible world.
A common denominator in definitions of indigenous knowledge is the emphasis given to the highly contextualized nature of such forms of knowledge, their connection to place, and the need to avoid judgments as to their worth or truth-value.
The non-believing historian will not accept from Iqbal, the believer, the proof-text of "revelation" for establishing mutually acceptable premises, or terms designed to hold truth-value, for a debate concerning the history of religions.
The prohibition against cruelty cannot be used to pass judgment on the powerful because it is a contingent fact lacking truth-value.
As author, narrator, and protagonist split, drift, and switch positions, they inhabit liminalities that reference contemporary debates about the truth-value of autobiographies.
However, some claims are such that the relevant things--a person's beliefs or intentions, a legal or grammatical rule--depend, in one way or another, on us; and some are such that it makes sense to ascribe a truth-value only relative to this or that community or social practice.
Beings higher in the hierarchy have a higher truth-value than beings lower down.
Through four main sections, each comprising numerous sub-chapters, Lollini effortlessly explores the problematic truth-value that emerges from the texts of an impressive number of philosophers, poets, and novelists.
The feminist argument that the subject position(s) of the speaker affect the content and truth-value of a statement implicitly shapes Authoring a Life.
Any feeling of spontaneity Ursa might have possessed in her five-year-old sense of proportions, in her childhood belief in verifying facts by inquiring as to their truth-value, is stunted by her Great Gram's physical and formulaic responses.