Ugliness


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

Ugliness

 

an aesthetic category, opposite and complementary to beauty. Ugliness describes an outwardly displayed violation of some inner standard of being. The Russian bezobraznoe denotes something unshaped, chaotic, and lacking obraz (form). Art attempts the reproduction of ugliness, which expresses the negative sides of reality, in order to portray reality in all its fullness. In this case, as has often been noted, beginning with Aristotle (see Poetics, 4. 1448 c), the artistic reproduction of ugliness, as distinct from actual ugliness, affords a certain aesthetic pleasure, connected with the mastery of the portrayal and the aesthetic discharging of negative emotions.

REFERENCES

Kagan, M. S. Lektsii po marksistsko-leninskoi estetike. Leningrad, 1963.
Pages 49–68.
Rosenkranz, C. Ästhetik des Hässlichen. Königsberg, 1853.

Ugliness

Avagddu
ugly child of Tegid Voel and Cerridwen. [Celtic Folklore: Parrinder, 35]
Balkis
hairy-legged type of Queen of Sheba. [Talmudic Legend: Walsh Classical, 45]
Bendith Y Mamau
stunted, ugly fairies; kidnapped children. [Celtic Folklore: Briggs, 21]
Berchta
beady-eyed, hook-nosed crone with clubfoot and stringy hair. [Ger. Folklore: Leach, 137]
Black Annis
cannibalistic hag with blue face and iron claws. [Br. Folklore: Briggs, 24]
Duessa
witch, stripped of lavish disguise, found to be hideous hag. [Br. Lit.: Faerie Queene]
Ethel
buck-toothed, gangly teenager in love with idler, Jughead. [Comics: “Archie” in Horn, 37]
Euryale and Stheno
the immortal Gorgons; had serpents for hair and brazen claws. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 114]
Frankenstein’s monster
ugly monster. [Br. Lit.: Frankenstein, Payton, 254]
gargoyles
medieval European church waterspouts; made in form of grotesque creatures. [Architecture: NCE, 1046]
Gorgons
snake-haired, winged creatures of frightful appearance. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 108]
Gross, Allison
repulsive witch “in the north country.” [Scot. Ballad: Childe Ballads]
Medusa
creature with fangs, snake-hair, and protruding tongue. [Gk. Myth.: Hall, 206]
Quasimodo
“Nowhere on earth a more grotesque creature.” [Fr. Lit.: The Hunchback of Notre Dame]
Spriggans
grotesque fairies; “dourest and most ugly set of sprights.” [Br. Folklore: Briggs, 380–381]
Ugly Duchess
repulsive woman with pocket-shaped mouth. [Br. Lit.: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland]
Ugly Duckling
ugly outcast until fully grown. [Fairy Tale: Misc.]
Witch of Wookey
repulsive hag curses boys and girls. [Br. Legend: Brewer Dictionary, 1164]
References in periodicals archive ?
Betts's short story in one brief paragraph, but only in terms of body image, since the woman's ugliness is a result of trauma.
In art, the tension generated by expansive inclusion of elements, the absurd and even ugliness and the uncanny, promotes understanding that may otherwise be lost.
I have been a subject of ridicule from society since childhood, and the world has seen that there is a beautiful side to my ugliness," he added.
As Joseph Ratzinger writes in "Wounded by the Arrow of Beauty," we wonder whether beauty is just a trap that pulls us into the empty ugliness, and if reality is, in the end, just a shade of grey without any flashes of red.
What comes out of the work is breathtaking chaos and animosity, suggesting that there is ugliness in mankind's beauty.
We equate both grievous and venial sins with ugliness.
Tears dried and sealed, Curse upon wars, all wars in this ugliness meant To beautify Flanders' fields.
The investigation is further broadened to include the relevance of female ugliness as a poetic manifesto of anti-Stilnovismo in the compositions of Cecco Angiolieri and Nicolo de' Rossi as well as its peculiar appearance as an antidote to lovesickness in Cavalcanti's and Niccola Muscia's poems.
Is the glamour finally wearing off our icons, revealing frailty, ugliness and loneliness underneath?
This happens one might say by the process through which I recognize the ugliness of my prejudice for you after attending to the ugliness in your attack on me.
Comper believed that it was by beauty that hearts and minds were won, and that it was by mediocrity, half-truths, and ugliness that they were turned away.