unavoidable delay

unavoidable delay

[¦ən·ə′vȯid·ə·bəl di′lā]
(industrial engineering)
Any delay in a task, the occurrence of which is outside the control or responsibility of the worker.
References in classic literature ?
At the last moment a telegram told of an unavoidable delay owing to the sudden illness of the specialist himself.
Among the most important aspects, she said, is to begin immediately or, if there is an unavoidable delay, to talk to the complainant and explain what is going on before tackling it as soon as possible.
John Rickards, general manager of Flip Out Basingstoke, said: "After an unavoidable delay, I'm pleased to announce that our trampoline and adventure park is now ready to open.
There was an unavoidable delay to the match kick-off to help us facilitate the safe arrival of all supporters to the ground on what was a busy night in the city, and we thank supporters for their cooperation and patience.
We are very excited to see this project finally come to fruition after years of careful planning and an unavoidable delay due to the economic downturn," said Mayor Hanauer.
79) The DOE's contracting officer identified six factors that, when taken together, support the conclusion that the DOE had encountered an unavoidable delay due to acts of government in establishing a permanent repository at Yucca Mountain.
Train left for Peshawar at 6 am today (Wednesday) and would reach at the destination with 13 hours unavoidable delay, he maintained.
But even with unavoidable delay, rising demand and oil prices above $100 a barrel, officials inside and outside OPEC say there is no need for panic.
The decision means that the government will not be able to employ the unavoidable delay defense in the ongoing litigation.
Being partners, both companies will share the risks if the project faces any problem or experiences unavoidable delay.
RvR: The main challenge is convincing the client of the need for recloning at almost any stage because they will only focus on the short-term unavoidable delay, rather than balancing it against the time and money it will save at later stages of product development.
Better contingency planning, with train operators, to minimise the impact of any unavoidable delay to the resumption of full services