Uncas

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Uncas

(ŭng`kəs), c.1588–c.1683, chief of the MoheganMohegan
, Native North Americans whose language belongs to the Algonquian branch of the Algonquian-Wakashan linguistic stock (see Native American languages). Also called the Mohican, they were the eastern branch of the Mahican. In the early 17th cent.
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. Uncas was a subchief of the PequotPequot
, Native North Americans whose language belongs to the Algonquian branch of the Algonquian-Wakashan linguistic stock (see Native American languages). The Pequot are of the Eastern Woodlands cultural area (see under Natives, North American).
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, but because of trouble with the chief, Sassacus, he withdrew with his followers and formed a separate tribe, the Mohegan. These people flourished under Uncas's leadership. Uncas was ambitious and sought British support. He was constantly at war with MiantonomoMiantonomo
, d. 1643, chief of the Narragansett; nephew of another chief, Canonicus. In 1637 he aided the English colonists in the Pequot War. The following year he was induced to make a treaty of peace with the English and with his ancient enemy, Uncas.
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, the Narragansett chief. Both sided with the British in the Pequot War, but despite a treaty of peace (1638) signed between them through the instrumentality of the British, trouble continued. Uncas finally captured Miantonomo in 1643 and killed him, with British acquiescence. For the remainder of his life Uncas was involved in various troubles with the British and other Native Americans.

Bibliography

See A. J. Peale, Uncas and the Mohegan-Pequot (1939).

Uncas

(?1606–82) Pequot/Mohegan leader; born in present-day Connecticut. He led rebellions against his father-in-law, Sassacus, the Pequot leader, eventually taking over part of the Pequot lands and ruling its people under their new tribal name, the Mohegans. He maintained power throughout much of his life with the help of the English colonists, whom he supported in the Pequot War (1636–37) and King Philip's War (1675–76).