implicit memory

(redirected from unconscious memories)
Also found in: Medical.

implicit memory

[im‚plis·ət ′mem·rē]
(psychology)
A type of memory that is expressed through performance, rather than conscious recall, such as information acquired during skill learning, habit formation, classical conditioning, emotional learning, and priming. Also known as nondeclarative memory.
References in classic literature ?
Certainly his kind have left horrible unconscious memories in all warm-blooded life.
So if the first concern of the natural philosopher is to learn how to distinguish between good and bad belief-habits, as Butler intimates when he speaks of the evolution of wisdom, the idea of good learning may not be so elusive after all; especially if a good part of the learning of infants involves the sort of steps that Butler describes when he traces the development of an embryo to various stages of unfolding unconscious memories that recall what its ancestors learned under similar circumstances.
Children of survivors gradually become aware of their parents' pain as they struggle through the conscious and unconscious memories of the atrocities of war.
The eye movements corresponded to activity in the hippocarnpus, a learning and memory center in the brain, suggesting that eye movements can reveal unconscious memories activated in the hippocampus.
Even generations after the main events of the novel, many of the ghosts and stories "occup[y] a dark corner in the dreams of every soul on the shore," unconscious memories that are as "ancient and abiding as the ocean itself" (114).
Faber claims that "It means that our religious life reaches all the way down to the infant and the child of the endopsychic world in whom reside our implicit, unconscious memories of the early symbiotic interactions" (p.