uncontrolled airspace


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uncontrolled airspace

That portion of the airspace that has not been designated as a control area, control zone, terminal control area, or transition area and within which ATC (air traffic control) has neither the authority nor the responsibility for exercising control over air traffic. On aeronautical charts, all areas except those marked as controlled airspace are uncontrolled airspaces.
References in periodicals archive ?
There's a reason the FARs require greater visibility to maintain VFR at night in uncontrolled airspace, and that special VFR at night requires an IFR-qualified airplane and an instrument-current pilot.
If you happen to be cruising under IFR in uncontrolled airspace (Why?
Accordingly, federal regulators should revise or update recently enacted rules governing the operation of small UAVs to provide definitive and deferential authority to local airports with respect to the operation of drones in uncontrolled airspace.
The research for the drone system is focused on what's known as uncontrolled airspace, a lower altitude that isn't currently managed by air traffic management.
Class G airspace is designated as uncontrolled airspace and is pretty much where you should be flying unless you have special permission.
By contrast, military helicopters routinely operate from sub-standard airfields, through uncontrolled airspace and into unimproved landing sites to support ground forces in the field.
Further factors included the small size of the kit plane, the speed of the aircraft and the fact both planes were in uncontrolled airspace, it added.
Current operations, in Class G uncontrolled airspace, requires air traffic control to re-route arriving aircraft or delay departing traffic to ensure the safety of all airspace users due to controllers having no information on other aircraft operating in the area.
airspace where air traffic service (ATC) is responsible for safe separation between aircraft or uncontrolled airspace where pilots are responsible for safe separation between aircraft.
The charts heavily accentuate Class E airspace, but our thinking is that few pilots regularly exploit the differences between controlled and uncontrolled airspace to justify such visual dominance.
In uncontrolled airspace ( zones where air traffic controllers do not track aircraft ( pilots avoid collisions simply by looking out for each other in what is called the "see and avoid" principle.