undertow


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undertow

1. the seaward undercurrent following the breaking of a wave on the beach
2. any strong undercurrent flowing in a different direction from the surface current

undertow

[′ən·dər‚tō]
(oceanography)
A subsurface seaward movement by gravity flow of water carried up on a sloping beach by waves or breakers.
References in periodicals archive ?
I always thought that it was the undertow that day even though they were only wading in one or two feet of water because it was so rough, but they ended up out near the end of the pier.
Call of the Undertow is out now in paperback and ebook.
The undertow in today's real estate market is in the Tractable-Homeless Capital.
There was an undertow and the bodies of Canadian troops were floating about, but we managed to get on to the beach.
It pulls the reader in as quickly and as effectively as a real undertow would an unwary swimmer.
On March 27, 2002, girlfriends Hayden Strickland and Jennifer Jackson, both 14, were wading in the Gulf of Mexico near Panama City Beach, Florida, when an undertow kept them from returning to the beach.
At once she was caught in the undertow of the ship, released, only to be grabbed again.
While some might see Seducing Doctor Lewis as yet another whimsical, feel-good picture about eccentric yokels, the movie has an undertow of pathos that deepens it.
Lost Classics of Salsa showcases the unsung, undertow bands that propelled the wave that swelled into the salsa boom of the 1970s.
The problem is, in the current Japanese economy, with a flat nominal GDP and deflationary undertow, you're not guaranteed rental tenants," he adds, pointing to the fears that a good chunk of the Shiodome City Center would be vacant after a merger between prospective tenants Mitsui Chemicals Inc.
A mighty undertow draws the unsuspecting bather into the depths, even unto death.
a print of blood: all along the undertow was listening