Unionist

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Related to unionism: trade unionism

Unionist

1. 
a. (before 1920) a supporter of the union of all Ireland and Great Britain
b. (since 1920) a supporter of union between Britain and Northern Ireland
2. a supporter of the US federal Union, esp during the Civil War
References in periodicals archive ?
Trade unionism in India has been concerned with regular or permanent workers in organized industries.
Taken in context, my declaration cannot reasonably be read as a condemnation of all forms of unionism.
The chapters on unions and ecology, community unionism and organizing migrant and immigrant workers are also useful.
In the event dual unionism is effectively ended during the one-year period of suspension, NYSNA may provide evidence of that fact and petition the ANA Board of Directors to have the suspension lifted.
Passage of the Taft-Hartley Act in 1947 was a setback, but the Old Unionism nonetheless continued to grow to a peak density (percentage of workers in unions) of 36 percent in 1953.
Key words: teacher activism, teacher unionism, social justice, teacher leadership
If people had to rub their eyes or rub their ears or listen to the statements twice in disbelief, then let that be an indication of the rubicon which unionism has crossed.
The book documents the rise of public-sector unionism in an era when private-sector unions are dying; exposes the political fragility of school boards; and, inadvertently, reveals that the power of unions extends well beyond the bargaining table, even to the point of shaping education research itself.
Addressing the concerns of both constituents and administrators in collective bargaining, and opening the way to speculation on the future of academic unionism, Academic Collective Bargaining is an insightful and scholarly treatment of its chosen field.
I wonder whether Stern's distaste for the democratic culture of trade unionism may prove, in the long run, to be labor's poison pill.
In this lucidly written history of Irish evangelical unionism, Patrick Mitchel applies that elusive biblical mandate that the Christian should "be in the world but not of it" to a Northern Irish context.