unobtrusive measures


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unobtrusive measures

any methods of collecting data without the knowledge of the subject and without affecting the data. Examples are very varied, e.g. studies of garbage, wear on carpets, recording how much coffee is consumed in meetings. What these unobtrusive methods have in common is that they avoid the problem of'subject reaction’ to the study. Hence they are less likely to distort the observations than standard ways of collecting data such as the completion of a questionnaire or an attitude test. In the latter cases the subjects are bound to be aware that they are taking part in research and this can produce artificial results. Unobtrusive measures are often used within a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH design and can be especially useful in evaluation research to reduce any distorting reaction to the evaluation on the part of the people being evaluated.
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To assure the evidence-based strategy used by the Club remained effective at addressing gaps in health information in the API community, the Club used unobtrusive measures to monitor its impact.
Unobtrusive measures first were described by Webb, Campbell, Schwartz, and Sechrest (1966, 2000), and their work remains the classic in this field.
Such unobtrusive measures may be much more meaningful than memory tests for studying MCI behaviors and perhaps responses to potential therapies.
This research textbook for sociology students covers the fundamentals of survey research, participant observation, life histories and unobtrusive measures while highlighting the focus on "capturing reality" that is unique to this discipline.
After that, you could skip around, focusing on chapters related to the type of research you are interested in: experimental research design, surveys, case studies, evaluations, developing questionnaires, interviewing, observing, gathering unobtrusive measures (that is, using archival data as source material), and so on.
Just as there are few unobtrusive measures in the social sciences, there are no unobtrusive measures of performance in public management.
Actually, a lot of the data we need to gather with respect to our school expectations will provide unobtrusive measures for everybody but the data collector.
As explained, unobtrusive measures are based on observing rather than gathering information directly from participants.
Unobtrusive measures or indirect measures first were described by Webb, Campbell, Schwartz, and Sechrest (1966, 2000) as methods of data collection which do not involve direct gathering of data from research subjects, such as with interviews and questionnaires.
Unobtrusive measures include archival data from records and documents related to activities of people, institutions, and other groups.
They share their personal challenges in this regard in introducing 17 chapters charting such methodological paths as narrative inquiry, grounded theory, unobtrusive measures, and focus groups.
After introducing the theories and methods of criminal justice research, describing qualitative and quantitative studies, and giving students a preview of the specialized terms and processes used throughout the text, he describes ethical considerations, research design, data-gathering strategies, sampling and survey research, participant observation, unobtrusive measures, secondary analysis, and use of official statistics.