unpaired electron

unpaired electron

[¦ən‚perd i′lek‚trän]
(atomic physics)
An orbital electron for which there is no other electron in the same atom with the same energy but opposite spin.
References in periodicals archive ?
A free radical is composed of oxygen in a highly reactive form with an unpaired electron that is capable of capturing electrons from other substances to neutralize itself.
Superoxides are toxic free radicals, molecules with one unpaired electron, that the immune system normally uses to kill invading microorganisms.
The unpaired electron of the tocopheroxyl radical thus formed tends to be delocalised rendering the radical more stable.
Free radicals or reactive oxygen species (ROS) are molecules or ions that have an unpaired electron that is desperately seeking to complete a pair.
In chemistry, a free radical is a molecule with an unpaired electron.
Radicals are molecules that have an odd number of electrons and consequently an unpaired electron spin that may be found in one of 2 spin states: [up arrow] or [down arrow].
Free radicals will steal an electron from a neighbouring molecule leaving that molecule with an unpaired electron that must now do the same to its neighbour.
The fact that they have an unpaired electron forces them to hunt out and steal electrons from other atoms, which perpetuates a damaging cycle.
The hydroxyl radical (OH) is an example of an odd electron molecule or free radical having an unpaired electron.
Simply put, free radicals are molecules that have an unpaired electron, and its altered energy state makes it highly reactive.