unravished bride

unravished bride

her portrait fixed in clay, she cannot fade but will be forever fair. [Br. Poetry: Keats “Ode on a Grecian Urn”]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, John Keats opens his "Ode on a Grecian Urn" with these lines: "Thou still unravished bride of quietness, / Thou foster child of silence and slow time.
he would have eliminated all ambiguity on the spot; had he used a comma instead, Thou still, unravished bride of quietness, Thou foster child of silence and slow time .
It "is a thought to be going on with," if only because it keeps the unravished bride and her pursuing bridegroom (i.
The use of the quality to suggest the emotional core of Vermeer images seems to owe more to an English-speaking collective memory of Keats's famous Ode to a Grecian Urn (1819)--'Thou still unravished bride of quietness, / Thou foster-child of silence and slow time'--than to anything tangible in Dutch art.
Grant Scott senses this: "The prospect of paralysis before the silent beauty of the unravished bride is never far from the speaker's mind.
The "still unravished bride of quietness" surprises as a conceit of an incipient allegory which does not develop into one.
The invocation which opens the Ode is the first assault on the integrity of the "still unravished bride of quietness," disregarding the urn's existence as a thing of beauty beyond the reach of communicative intimacy.
In the Ode, he finds, "the prospect of paralysis before the silent beauty of the unravished bride is never far from the speaker's mind" (132).
As Miller points out, by 1820 Keats would address that "still unravished bride of quietness" as the "foster-child of silence and slow time," quite certain that no amount of antiquarian activity would reveal the original subject of his Grecian Urn.
Childs herself remains timeless, centered, as ever the unravished bride of quietness.
These are not unravished brides, and they seem happy with that (one of them is, in fact, Kurland's mother).