unstable

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unstable

1. (of a chemical compound) readily decomposing
2. Physics
a. (of an elementary particle) having a very short lifetime
b. spontaneously decomposing by nuclear decay; radioactive
3. Electronics (of an electrical circuit, mechanical body, etc.) having a tendency to self-oscillation

unstable

[¦ən′stā·bəl]
(physics)
Capable of undergoing spontaneous change, as in a radioactive nuclide or an excited nuclear system.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first part charts some recent changes to Wright's views, arguing that, surprisingly, his current position ends up unstably sharing a central tenet of deflationism.
Earthquakes can also set off monstrous submarine landslides in which tens of cubic kilometres of sediment perched unstably at the edges of the continental shelf plunge down into the abyss at 500km per hour, setting the surface waters in violent motion.
Texts therefore lack closure or resolution and are never self-sufficient; instead, meaning is generated unstably from the process of interaction between the text and a web of other possible texts and contexts.
If I don't have it, the tendon could join together in an abstract and wonky manner - ie prettily, but unstably - so hack away Doc
Family structure was measured from the interview year after the child's birth to the assessment year and categorized as stably unmarried, unstably married, and stably married.
More consequentially, though, this text "symbolically closes a specific discourse, a way of language whose geography, local traditions, and class assignments had always only unstably appropriated, reformed, or recalculated commonplace cultural properties" (290).
We concluded by suggesting that concern must be directed toward those key parameters that are loosely and unstably constructed, giving rise to the presence of mental illness.
Masculine sexuality is' shown to be complex and unstably implicated within the whole social domain (A6D 935).
All of these are as perceived by the individual, and all may be understood to operate reflexively and unstably with the others.