uplift pressure

uplift pressure

[′əp‚lift ‚presh·ər]
(civil engineering)
Pressure in an upward direction against the bottom of a structure, as a dam, a road slab, or a basement floor.
References in periodicals archive ?
When added to the underside of the roof deck InsulStar enhances the connection strength of the existing roof system, which helps mitigate the effects of wind uplift pressure, according to the company.
5 psf wind uplift pressure is highest in its category," said Jason Hoerter, PE, RRO, product manager for NCFI.
24 m/s), there was a high effect of the uplift pressure, which balanced the downward force from the vehicle weight, water weight, and slab weight.
This may be explained by the composite effect of the loading on the slab, where an increase of flow velocity increased the uplift pressure and the horseshoe vortex.
It also pointed out that the equipment installed by the Tamil Nadu government to measure the uplift pressure did not yield expected results, he said.
Weidner, "Experiments on Uplift Pressure in Masonry Dams," Engineering News 70 (July 31, 1913): 202-205; Letter from Edward Godfrey, Engineering News 70 (Aug.
Rather, concern focused on theoretical means of precisely calculating uplift pressure in relation to: (a) the horizontal cross section of the dam or foundation (that is, the "area factor") and (b) how various technologies, such as cut-off trenches, grouting, drainage wells, etc.
Rogers avers that "many engineers were just beginning to appreciate the destabilizing effects of uplift pressures in the late 1920s" and promotes the impression that uplift represented an esoteric, little-appreciated phenomenon when St.
In reality, the wind uplift pressure is dynamic, and the response of the roofing structure is dynamic as well.
THE WIND-UPLIFT TEST: In accordance with Factory Mutual Protocol, FMRC 12/24 wind-uplift pressure test Appendix D and the Dade County roofing protocol PA-114-95 Appendix D for simulated uplift pressure resistance of adhered roof systems assembly.
Clemons explained: "The wind uplift pressure requirements vary for buildings and is determined by a building's height, width and location.
According to Uddin, the technology is light weight and also could help the structures survive hurricane storm surge and the resulting flooding, by essentially allowing the buildings to float on the rising tide once uplift pressures from climbing water levels force the structures free from their foundations.