Usurpation

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Related to usurpations: Declaration of Independence, evinced

Usurpation

 

unlawful seizure; appropriation by force of another’s rights. In politics, usurpation is the unlawful seizure of government power or the appropriation of the office and functions of a head of state by means of a coup d’etat with the intention of establishing a personal dictatorship. An example is Napoleon Bonaparte’s seizure of power through a coup in 1799.

Usurpation

Adonijah
presumptuously assumed David’s throne before Solomon’s investiture. [O.T.: I Kings 1:5–10]
Anschluss Nazi
takeover of Austria (1938). [Eur. Hist.: Hitler, 590–627]
Athaliah
steals throne by killing all royal line. [O.T.: II Kings 11:1]
Claudius
usurped throne of Hamlet’s father. [Br. Lit.: Hamlet]
Frederick
arrogated dominions of his brother. [Br. Lit.: As You Like It]
Glorious Revolution
James II deposed; William and Mary enthroned (1688). [Br. Hist.: EB, 3: 248]
Godunov, Boris
(c. 1551–1605) cunningly has tsarevich murdered; gallantly accepts throne. [Russ. Lit.: Boris Godunov; Russ. Opera: Moussorgsky, Boris Godunov]
Menahem
murders Shallum and enthrones himself. [O.T.: II Kings 15:14]
Otrepyev, Grigory
baseborn monk assumes dead tsarevich’s identity and throne. [Russ. Lit.: Boris Gudonov; Russ. Opera: Moussorgsky, Boris Godunov]
References in periodicals archive ?
Scalia's ferocious dissents are designed to foster opposition to the Court's antidemocratic usurpations.
However, what couldn't be obtained in one outright usurpation is being obtained through gradual encroachment.
In 1998, the American Bar Association's Task Force on Federalization of Criminal Law decried the ongoing trend of usurpation of state authority by the federal government in the area of criminal law.
The history of the current president of the United States of America, like many of his predecessors, is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establish-merit of an absolute tyranny over these United States.
The Founders, however, harbored no illusion that the Constitution they had created possessed any magical, self-enforcing power against corruption and usurpation.
He called it "a complete usurpation by the president of authority to use the Armed Forces of this country" and insisted that only Congress could send our forces to war.