utility computing


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Related to utility computing: Grid computing

utility computing

Pay-per-usage processing from a datacenter service provider. Customers access the computers in the datacenter via private lines or over the Internet and are charged for the amount of computing time they use in CPU seconds, minutes and hours. Also called "on-demand computing," utility computing was originally based on proprietary standards; however, it evolved into "cloud computing," which uses global standard Internet and Web protocols. If the service provider includes the application programs, it is called an "application service provider" (ASP) and falls under the umbrella of "software-as-a-service" (SaaS). See cloud computing, ASP and SaaS.
References in periodicals archive ?
That is because utility computing lives or dies on the integration of its parts.
Others viewed utility computing as a model to centralise the IT infrastructure, with the intention of providing a more cost-effective service, with the capacity to charge individual business units for the resources they use.
Beyond the provisioning of available desktop central processing unit cycles, utility computing would allow the provisioning of data centers, networks, computers, storage, applications and data on a "when-needed basis" at a fixed price per unit, he added.
Indeed, utility computing aims to strengthen the delivery of business process and management functions integral to the way the organization works.
Above all, utility computing is based on the principle of creative frugality: Get the most out of what you already have.
An IBM study concluded that with the help of utility computing models, life insurers could potentially reduce the total fixed costs for the enterprise "by up to 50%," and shift the expense mix "so that 90% of all expenses are variable.
In its widest meaning, utility computing refers to the practice of automatically matching centralized resources to an application's demands, then charging the business unit for usage.
All of this makes the promise of utility computing very compelling:
Utility computing is especially well suited to rack-mounted servers like blades or bricks.