vain


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vain

to use the name of someone, esp God, without due respect or reverence
b. Jocular to mention someone's name
References in classic literature ?
At last his Sail-broad Vannes He spreads for flight, and in the surging smoak Uplifted spurns the ground, thence many a League As in a cloudy Chair ascending rides Audacious, but that seat soon failing, meets A vast vacuitie: all unawares Fluttring his pennons vain plumb down he drops Ten thousand fadom deep, and to this hour Down had been falling, had not by ill chance The strong rebuff of som tumultuous cloud Instinct with Fire and Nitre hurried him As many miles aloft: that furie stay'd, Quencht in a Boggie SYRTIS, neither Sea, Nor good dry Land: nigh founderd on he fares, Treading the crude consistence, half on foot, Half flying; behoves him now both Oare and Saile.
As before, it was in vain that I, at first, endeavoured to appreciate or understand what was taking place.
To talk of the past was to torture him with vain remorse; to refer to the future was to increase his anguish; and yet to be silent was to leave him a prey to his own regrets and apprehensions.
If the girl had been one of those vain trollops, of which we have too many in the parish, I should have condemned my brother for his lenity towards her.
Good actors have I found all the vain ones: they play, and wish people to be fond of beholding them--all their spirit is in this wish.
Therefore am I forbearing to the vain, because they are the physicians of my melancholy, and keep me attached to man as to a drama.
And further, who conceiveth the full depth of the modesty of the vain man
And if that be the true virtue which is unconscious of itself--well, the vain man is unconscious of his modesty
But disguised do I want to see YOU, ye neighbours and fellowmen, and well- attired and vain and estimable, as "the good and just;"--
SIDON, Lebanon: Sidon MP Bahia Hariri voiced hope that students would take their official exams without disruption this year, stressing that the effort expended by teachers and students during the academic year must not be in vain.
If it is granted that soldiers can die in vain, then it is incumbent that the cause soldiers do die for ought to be good.
Taking the name of the Lord in vain can seem unimportant in our society, and making an effort to avoid it--compared with other evils needing attention--seems almost frivolous.