validity

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validity

[və′lid·əd·ē]
(mathematics)
Correctness; especially the degree of closeness by which iterated results approach the correct result.

validity

the extent to which a measure, indicator or method of data collection possesses the quality of being sound or true as far as can be judged. For example, if a psychological measure, such as an intelligence test, is considered to be valid, this means that it is thought to measure what it sets out to measure. If social survey observations are said to have produced valid data, then they are considered to be true reflection of the phenomenon being studied in the population being studied (e.g. projections of voting behaviour), and the survey method could be said to have validity. Compare RELIABILITY.

In practice, in sociology and the social sciences generally, the relation between indicators and measures on the one hand and the underlying concepts they are taken to represent is often contested (see OFFICIAL STATISTICS, MEASUREMENT BY FIAT).

References in periodicals archive ?
Also shown are the mean observed validities (r) and their standard deviation (SDf), the operational validities one can expect once artifactual error from range restriction in predictor scores and criterion unreliability has been removed (rho), and their standard deviation (SDrho).
This last figure denotes the validity value at or above which 90% of all true validities lie and, consequently, the minimum value one can expect in 9 out of 10 cases.
The mean N-weighted validities across the criteria studied varied between .
In contrast to all other net validities, it was higher than the mean observed validity; that is, compared to the other criterion categories, its validity was underestimated by methodological features.
do not report the significance level for validities.
The validities for the Rotary Pursuit Test in the four studies conducted appear in Table 2.
The results suggest that the use of a priori hypotheses may have been the main reason why the current study produced better validities than previous meta-analyses of personality.
Criterion-related validities of personality constructs and the effect of response distortion on those validities.