vannevar

vannevar

(jargon)
/van'*-var/ A bogus technological prediction or a foredoomed engineering concept, especially one that fails by implicitly assuming that technologies develop linearly, incrementally, and in isolation from one another when in fact the learning curve tends to be highly nonlinear, revolutions are common, and competition is the rule. The prototype was Vannevar Bush's prediction of "electronic brains" the size of the Empire State Building with a Niagara-Falls-equivalent cooling system for their tubes and relays, a prediction made at a time when the semiconductor effect had already been demonstrated. Other famous vannevars have included magnetic-bubble memory, LISP machines, videotex, and a paper from the late 1970s that computed a purported ultimate limit on areal density for integrated circuits that was in fact less than the routine densities of 5 years later.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prior to NSF, Suresh was dean of the School of Engineering and Vannevar Bush Professor of Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
The social contract between society and science, as encapsulated in Vannevar Bush's metaphor of the endless frontier, calls on science only to deliver new knowledge.
Now, Dao and colleagues, including CMU President Suresh, former dean of MIT's School of Engineering and the Vannevar Bush Professor of Engineering Emeritus, have developed a tiny microfluidic device that can analyze the behavior of blood from sickle cell disease patients.
Subra Suresh, president of Carnegie Mellon, the Vannevar Bush Professor of Engineering Emeritus, and a former dean of engineering at MIT, and Tony Jun Huang, a professor of engineering science and mechanics at Penn State, are also senior authors of the paper.
Vannevar Bush, former Dean of Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and head of United States Office of Scientific Research and Development during World War II, among other notable roles, established the modern innovation system, pushing forward the National Science Foundation, NASA, the Manhattan Project, and other efforts.
The origins of hypertext can be traced to Vannevar Bush's article "As We May Think" in which he outlined a plan for the "memex" machine, an information storage system, built using microform technology, in which items would be catalogued according to "associative indexing" (45).
She has served as president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and has received many awards, including the National Science Foundation's highest honor, the Vannevar Bush Award.
The first chapter is an overview of the history of HCI going all the way back to Vannevar Bush's notion of the "memex" in his famous 1945 essay "As We May Think" and moving through the invention of the computer mouse in 1963, and then onto the first GUIs in the Xerox Star computer and the Apple Macintosh during the 1980s.
Roosevelt and Vannevar Bush sought to sustain the momentum of discovery and technology development during peacetime (Stokes, 1997).
The Federal government's involvement in the funding of modern science grew dramatically after World War ii when President Roosevelt challenged Vannevar Bush, Director of the Office of Scientific Research to answer the question: "what can the Government do now and in the future to aid research activities by public and private organizations?
32) Seated before the Senate Special Committee on Atomic Energy in December 1945, Vannevar Bush, director of the government's Office of Scientific Research and Development (which had run the Manhattan Project till 1943), confidently proclaimed that long-range nuclear-armed ballistic missiles were too complex for the near future.