varicoloured

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varicoloured

(US), varicolored
having many colours; variegated; motley
References in periodicals archive ?
Hsiao Mei-nu, the manager of a local cafe, said that the soup of the agar hotpot is made from cooking local agar for a long time, and the hotpot dishes include fresh vegetables, locally cultured varicolored abalone and freshly caught seafood such as squids.
The water in the lake pulsed with a soft, barely perceptible, varicolored light.
The salient difference between Cinderella and her sisters, unfortunately for all you defenders and upholders of the Protestant work ethic out there, is not that she eats her bread in the sweat of her brow while they eat sweetmeats, try on varicolored gowns, and loaf about.
As expected, I was wowed by the wrestlers' varicolored robes and plus-size bodies, but I left more impressed with the bustling spectators and their super-sized hearts.
In many populations, besides varicolored females (like males), more or less green ones are also found (Fig.
Every aspect of human existence in its varicolored forms is presented to us in this monumental work, and the value of each is tested in terms of Faust's own evaluation.
Boudin uses varicolored shades of gray to distinguish the sky from the water in The Beach.
I live here too because New Mexico is the last silent sanctuary where I can enjoy the splendid isolation that is the imperative of art, where you can contemplate eons of time in the violent riot of the varicolored mesas .
Well-crystallized, varicolored Illinois fluorite and associated minerals from Rosiclare and Cave-in-Rock in the southern part of the state adorn the mineral cabinets of collectors around the world.
He recorded faithfully, in a shorthand diary, supported by varicolored sketches, the places, trains, ships, troops, and cities from Richmond through South Carolina and Georgia.
If the diablitos and the carnival figures pick up the dance and the music, the varicolored exterior, strong and rhythmic, these usually one-colored faces prolong the pensiveness and labyrinths of the city.
John Weaver, a noted Nebraska scholar of the prairie habitat, observed (1954) that the prairie appears almost monotonous in the general uniformity of its plant cover--but that it also has a special grandeur in its open expanses and in the abundance of its varicolored flowers.